wet (one's) whistle

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wet (one's) whistle

To have something to drink. I'm parched. I'm going to need to wet my whistle before we go on. If you're looking for Barney, he's down at the pub wetting his whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wet one's whistle

Rur. to take a drink. He stopped at the bar to wet his whistle. I don't need a big glass of water. Just enough to wet my whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wet one's whistle

Have a drink, as in I'm just going to wet my whistle before I go out on the tennis court. This expression uses whistle in the sense of "mouth" and may allude to the fact that it is very hard to whistle with dry lips. [Late 1300s]
See also: wet, whistle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet your whistle

OLD-FASHIONED, INFORMAL
If you wet your whistle, you have a drink, especially an alcoholic drink. There's a mouth-watering menu and an excellent selection of beers to wet your whistle. Note: `Whistle' is an old slang word for mouth or throat.
See also: wet, whistle
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

wet your whistle

have a drink. informal
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet your ˈwhistle

(old-fashioned, informal) have an alcoholic drink
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet (one's) whistle

Informal
To take a drink.
See also: wet, whistle
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet one's whistle, to

To have a drink. It is very difficult to whistle with dry lips. An old children’s party game involves eating some dry crackers or bread and attempting to whistle; the first to succeed in doing so wins a prize. The term has been around since the fourteenth century. It appeared in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: “So was her joly whistle wel y-wet” (The Reeve’s Tale).
See also: to, wet
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
I'll take another glass of the sherry wine, just to wet my whistle, as the vulgar saying is, before I begin.
I ordered a pint of Black Sheep to wet my whistle, while Mrs Eats had a glass of white wine.
The first rose to really wet my whistle was Palacio de la Vega from Spain''s Navarra region - for a long time a mainstay of Oddbins.
As a non-beer drinker, I found plenty to wet my whistle, including an amazing apple ice wine from Still River Winery (Harvard) that was one of the best sipping wines I have had in a long time.
"I usually do but this time there was a big traffic jam on the Forth Road Bridge after an accident so we all got here a bit late with no time to wet my whistle."
But it was a great experience and wet my whistle for live TV.'
'While the drummer was doing his solo, I was given a pint to wet my whistle. I had nowhere to put it, so I stuck it on my head and began parading around the stage.