wet (one's) whistle

(redirected from wet his whistle)
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

wet (one's) whistle

To have something to drink. I'm parched. I'm going to need to wet my whistle before we go on. If you're looking for Barney, he's down at the pub wetting his whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wet one's whistle

Rur. to take a drink. He stopped at the bar to wet his whistle. I don't need a big glass of water. Just enough to wet my whistle.
See also: wet, whistle
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wet one's whistle

Have a drink, as in I'm just going to wet my whistle before I go out on the tennis court. This expression uses whistle in the sense of "mouth" and may allude to the fact that it is very hard to whistle with dry lips. [Late 1300s]
See also: wet, whistle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet your whistle

OLD-FASHIONED, INFORMAL
If you wet your whistle, you have a drink, especially an alcoholic drink. There's a mouth-watering menu and an excellent selection of beers to wet your whistle. Note: `Whistle' is an old slang word for mouth or throat.
See also: wet, whistle
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

wet your whistle

have a drink. informal
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet your ˈwhistle

(old-fashioned, informal) have an alcoholic drink
See also: wet, whistle
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wet (one's) whistle

Informal
To take a drink.
See also: wet, whistle
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wet one's whistle, to

To have a drink. It is very difficult to whistle with dry lips. An old children’s party game involves eating some dry crackers or bread and attempting to whistle; the first to succeed in doing so wins a prize. The term has been around since the fourteenth century. It appeared in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: “So was her joly whistle wel y-wet” (The Reeve’s Tale).
See also: to, wet
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
That's because the creepycrawly wet his whistle inside a bottle of vodka, and had a fly old time.
Before that he'd like to sip suds with Tom Brady on the field at Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, or wet his whistle with President Barack Obama on his summer trip to Martha's Vineyard.
Syntax in the middle of a smoking hot political squabble wishes to wet his whistle A TWOBED A Comfortable Nap in a Post-Chaise, (main picture) a Rowlandson print published in 1792, estimate pounds 180-pounds 220; Rowlandson watercolour sketch, The Departure of a French Diligence, valued at pounds 2000-pounds 3000 COTTAGE
Mr Osborne, who was plagued with a frog croaking in his throat and had to wet his whistle on numerous occasions, was upbeat from beginning to end.
Mr Osborne, who was plagued with a frog croaking in his throat and had to wet his whistle on numerous occasions, was upbeat from beginning to end, with Prime Minister David Cameron, the epitome of admiration, nodding enthusiastically at every new announcement.
Another time he famously went to wet his whistle in a Paris bar, only to wake up in Corsica.
THE LAST time Kieron Dyer ventured abroad, he stayed just long enough to wet his whistle in a few Marbella watering holes before being sent packing with his tail between his legs.