wet blanket, a

wet blanket

Someone who ruins other people's fun. Don't invite Nicole to the party. She's such a wet blanket that she'll probably just complain the whole time. David was tired of being called a wet blanket by his friends just because he doesn't drink alcohol.
See also: blanket, wet

wet blanket

Fig. a dull or depressing person who spoils other people's enjoyment. Jack's fun at parties, but his brother's a wet blanket. I was with Anne and she was being a real wet blanket.
See also: blanket, wet

wet blanket

A person who discourages enjoyment or enthusiasm, as in Don't be such a wet blanket-the carnival will be fun! This expression alludes to smothering a fire with a wet blanket. [Early 1800s]
See also: blanket, wet

a wet blanket

INFORMAL
If you call someone a wet blanket, you mean that they stop other people from enjoying themselves by being boring or miserable. `Hey', said Thack, looking at Michael. `Stop being such a wet blanket.' I'm sorry if I've been a wet blanket today.
See also: blanket, wet

a wet blanket

someone who has a depressing or discouraging effect on others.
A dampened blanket can be used to smother a fire; the image here is of a person extinguishing a lively or optimistic mood by their gloominess or negativity.
1991 Michael Curtin The Plastic Tomato Cutter When in the company of those of us who do succumb to the occasional dram Father Willie was never a wet blanket.
See also: blanket, wet

a ˌwet ˈblanket

(informal, disapproving) a person who is not enthusiastic about anything and who stops other people from enjoying themselves: She was such a wet blanket at the party that they never invited her again. OPPOSITE: a live wire
A wet blanket can be used to help put out a fire.
See also: blanket, wet

wet blanket

n. someone who ruins a good time. (In the way that a wet blanket is used to put out a fire.) Oh, Martin! Why do you have to be such a wet blanket?
See also: blanket, wet

wet blanket, a

A person or thing that spoils the fun. This term, alluding to a device used to smother a fire, has been around since the early nineteenth century. Mrs. Anne Mathews used it in Tea-Table Talk (1857): “Such people may be the wet blankets of society.”
See also: wet

wet blanket

A spreader of gloom. What could put more of a damper on lovely summer day picnic than a wet ground cloth—unless it's a person who, by word or deed, spoils everyone's fun? Such a spoilsport at any otherwise enjoyable event goes by the epithet “wet blanket,” better known to recent generations as a party pooper.
See also: blanket, wet