go (the) whole hog

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go (the) whole hog

To do something as thoroughly as possible or without restraint. We only planned to order appetizers, but we went whole hog and ended up getting a seven-course meal. You only live once. Might as well go the whole hog and get the works.
See also: go, hog, whole
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go whole hog

to do everything possible; to be extravagant. Let's go whole hog. Order steak and lobster. Show some restraint. Don't go whole hog all the time.
See also: go, hog, whole
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go whole hog

Also, go the limit. Do something completely or thoroughly; proceed as far as possible. For example, Instead of just painting the room, why not go whole hog and redecorate it completely? or Let's go the limit and dig up the entire garden. Although the precise source of whole hog is disputed, this colloquialism was first recorded in 1828 (in Japhet by Frederick Marryat) as go the whole hog. Today the article is usually omitted. Go the limit, also a colloquialism, dates from the mid-1900s. Also see all out.
See also: go, hog, whole
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go the whole hog

BRITISH or

go whole hog

AMERICAN
COMMON If someone goes the whole hog, they do something to the fullest extent possible. Note: A hog is a pig. We could be restrained and just have a main course — or go the whole hog and have all three courses. The victim had been identified, and the newspaper continued to go whole hog on the story. Note: This expression may have its origin in butchers asking their customers which part of the pig they wished to buy, or whether they would `go the whole hog' and buy the whole pig. Alternatively, `hog' was a slang term for a ten cent piece in America, and also for an Irish shilling, so the expression may originally have meant `spend the full amount'.
See also: go, hog, whole
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go the whole hog

do something completely or thoroughly. informal
The origin of the phrase is uncertain, but a fable in William Cowper's The Love of the World: Hypocrisy Detected ( 1779 ) is sometimes mentioned: certain Muslims, forbidden to eat pork by their religion but tempted to indulge in some, maintained that Muhammad had had in mind only one particular part of the animal. They could not agree which part that was, and as ‘for one piece they thought it hard From the whole hog to be debarred’ between them they ate the whole animal, each salving his conscience by telling himself that his own particular portion was not the one that had been forbidden. Go the whole hog is recorded as a political expression in the USA in the early 19th century; an 1835 source maintains that it originated in Virginia ‘marking the democrat from a federalist’.
See also: go, hog, whole
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go the ˌwhole ˈhog

(informal) do something thoroughly or completely: They painted the kitchen and then decided to go the whole hog and do the other rooms as well.
See also: go, hog, whole
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

whole hog, the/to go

The ultimate extent; to do something completely or thoroughly. The precise meaning and origin of this cliché have been lost. Charles Funk thought it came from a poem by William Cowper (1731–1800) that told of the Islamic prohibition against eating pork: “But for one piece they thought it hard From the whole hog to be debar’d.” A more likely source is the Irish word hog for the British shilling, American ten-cent piece, and other coins, whereby “going the whole hog” would mean spending the entire shilling or dime at one time. On the other hand, Frederick Marryat, writing in 1836 (Japhet), called it an American term. It may be derived from the American colloquialism to hog, meaning to appropriate greedily. Whichever is true, the term is a cliché on both sides of the Atlantic.
See also: go, to, whole
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The plan to divide Punjab for questionable reasons and motives could backfire in the general election as we witnessed during 2013 elections when PPP went whole hog to create a new province in Punjab but voters eliminated it all together.
I didn't really have the stones to excel at this game although on my last day I went whole hog and attempted a microwave.
I went whole hog on the Summer Special II for my Kimber Pro, which is my favorite EDC.
In fact, I went whole hog and used an old competitive shooter's trick: My dominant eye lens is optimized for clarity at front sight distance, and my non-dominant eye lens is focused on infinity.
"One of the innovations we came up with was saying that not only can we make it asynchronous, but we went whole hog and decided not to pretend it's synchronous in any way," said Chilimbi.
Though the excise duty itself was a big blow to the industry, it received a bolt from the blue when excise authorities sought to recover past dues in lieu as they went whole hog to implement a 2012 Supreme Court ruling given out in the case of Fiat.
Trudgeon said the effort to move the credit unions it serves to real-time Falcon "went whole hog in 2011" and will continue this year.
Enig: We went whole hog in replacing saturated fats with trans fats in food processing and at the table--and it has backfired.
So this pig went whole hog. I may have been the last on my block to get a cell phone, but I was the first to have an Internet phone.