wedge in


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wedge in

1. To become lodged, jammed, or stuck into some tight space. I thought the car would fit, but it ended up wedging in the narrow alleyway. The fabric got caught on the machinery and wedged in.
2. To jam or lodge someone or something into some tight space. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wedge" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. The table kept wobbling, so I wedged in a napkin under one of the legs. I was wedged in my seat for the entire performance. She wedged her hand in the opening to stop the leak.
See also: wedge

wedge in

v.
To lodge or jam something or someone in some location: I accidently wedged my hat in the flue. The box was wedged in the crawl space.
See also: wedge
References in periodicals archive ?
This will destroy a beautiful part of the green wedge in Thornaby.
The latest vehicle of Promethean thrust and stratospheric price to adopt this form is the 2011 Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4, the flagship for a brand that first put a wedge in a motor show in 1967.
WE started to talk about wedges last week when, for average club golfers, I recommended you carry a pitching wedge, a sand wedge and a lob wedge in your bag.
The clamp consists of a steel wedge in an aluminum channel and a screw.
The reason for this is that golfers have come to realise that having the right sand wedge in the bag is as important as having the right putter.
FTE has been an integral partner in the Wedge strategy since Phillip Johnson first organized the Wedge in the early 1990s....
Clamping to the live end could add a wear point, bend the nearly straight line, and keep the wire rope from pulling the wedge in tight against the socket.
He said, ``Cardiff is characterised by four major green corridors which stretch out from the city centre - Bute Park and Llandaff fields along the River Taff to the north, the Rhymney river corridor in the east, the Ely river corridor in the west, and the Roath Park/Nant Fawr wedge in the north east.