weave in and out

weave in and out

To move in, between, and out of something, then back again. The suspect began weaving in and out of various alleyways in an effort to lose the police. Some maniac weaved in and out of cars as he went flying down the highway at nearly 150 miles an hour. The running back wove in and out of the defensive players to gain nearly 50 yards on his run.
See also: and, out, weave
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

weave in and out (of something)

Fig. to move, drive, or walk in and out of something, such as traffic, a line, etc. The car was weaving in and out of traffic dangerously. The deer ran rapidly through the forest, weaving in and out of the trees.
See also: and, out, weave
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

weave in and out

Move by twisting and turning or winding in and out, as in The motorcycle wove in and out of traffic, leaving us far behind. This expression is a redundancy, since weave literally means "intertwine strands of thread."
See also: and, out, weave
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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