weave


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bob and weave

To move quickly up and down and side to side, typically in an attempt to evade someone or something. You need to bob and weave more so that your opponent can't hit you.
See also: and, bob, weave

get weaving

To start doing something. Primarily heard in UK. Come on, let's get weaving—we've wasted enough time already.
See also: get, weave

underwater basket weaving

Any college or university course that is absurd in its uselessness or irrelevance, especially an elective unrelated to one's degree that is very easy to pass. I spent most of my first year in college partying. On the actual academic front, well, most of my classes were in underwater basket weaving. Instead of learning practical things like business management and economics, students these days are filling their days with underwater basket weaving and other such nonsense.
See also: basket, weave

weave (one's) magic

To use one's unique talents or charm to obtain a desired thing or outcome. I never thought the boss would approve our business trip, but Sam wove her magic, and now, we're off to Denver! Whenever I can't get my car running, I have my dad come over and weave his magic on the engine.
See also: magic, weave

weave (something) from (something) else

1. To create something by weaving some material together. I learned how to weave a basket from reeds. They wove this beautiful tapestry from spider silk.
2. To concoct something, such as a story, out of some certain information. The scriptwriter wove a narrative from the diary entries of a young man who was stationed in Vietnam at the time. You should weave your stories from the interactions and events you've experienced in real life.
See also: else, weave

weave (something) into (something) else

1. To use a particular material to create something through weaving. I learned how to weave reeds into a rudimentary basket. The team of specialists spent three years weaving the silk of over a million spiders into a stunning ceremonial cape.
2. To combine several distinct pieces or sources of information into a single cohesive story. The scriptwriter wove the testimony of everyone involved into a gripping legal thriller. I bet you'd be able to weave these diary entries into a beautiful novel.
See also: else, weave

weave around

1. To move around from side to side in a meandering or unsteady manner. I could tell he was drunk by the way he was weaving around after we left the bar. When the bus driver started weaving around on the road, I worried that he might have fallen asleep!
2. To avoid someone or something by moving deftly from side to side. The waiter weaved around the tables of people, her arms laden with plates of food. We had to weave around the police officers who were inspecting people's bags on the sidewalk.
See also: around, weave

weave in and out

To move in, between, and out of something, then back again. The suspect began weaving in and out of various alleyways in an effort to lose the police. Some maniac weaved in and out of cars as he went flying down the highway at nearly 150 miles an hour. The running back wove in and out of the defensive players to gain nearly 50 yards on his run.
See also: and, out, weave

weave through (something)

To pass through a dense group by moving deftly in between the people or things within. He wove through the crowd of people to avoid the police officer. We had to weave through the forest as we ran back to camp. I felt certain the motorcycle was going to crash, judging by how dangerously it was weaving through traffic.
See also: through, weave

weave around

to move about, changing directions at random. The drunken driver wove around all over the road. He was weaving around everywhere.
See also: around, weave

weave in and out (of something)

Fig. to move, drive, or walk in and out of something, such as traffic, a line, etc. The car was weaving in and out of traffic dangerously. The deer ran rapidly through the forest, weaving in and out of the trees.
See also: and, out, weave

weave something from something

 
1. to make a fabric from some type of fiber. They weave this cloth from a fine plant fiber. This cloth is woven from silk threads.
2. Fig. to make a story or explanation out of a small amount of information. (Fig. on {2}.) You have woven the entire tale from something you heard me say to Ruth. Your explanation has been woven from supposition.
See also: weave

weave something into something

 
1. to form fibers into a fabric. They could weave the threads into simple cloth with a primitive loom. We will weave this wool into a rug.
2. Fig. to turn separate episodes into a story. (Fig. on {2}.) Skillfully, the writer wove the elements into a clever story. Memories from her childhood were woven into a series of short stories.
See also: weave

weave through something

to move through something by turning and dodging. The car wove through traffic, almost hitting a number of other cars. We wove through the jungle vines, trying to avoid touching the poisonous ones.
See also: through, weave

weave in and out

Move by twisting and turning or winding in and out, as in The motorcycle wove in and out of traffic, leaving us far behind. This expression is a redundancy, since weave literally means "intertwine strands of thread."
See also: and, out, weave

bob and weave

make rapid bodily movements up and down and from side to side.
See also: and, bob, weave

get weaving

set briskly to work; begin action. British informal
1992 George MacDonald Fraser Quartered Safe Out Here Come on, come on, come on!…Let's get weaving!
See also: get, weave

weave your ˈmagic

,

weave a ˈspell (over somebody)

(especially British English) perform or behave in a way that attracts and interests somebody very much or makes them react in a particular way: Will Owen be able to weave his magic against Spain on Wednesday?
See also: magic, weave

underwater basket weaving

n. an imaginary, very easy high school or college course. If I can just find a course in underwater basket weaving, I’ll have an easy semester.
See also: basket, weave
References in periodicals archive ?
Each weave type creates a different surface texture.
The unbalanced plain weave glass/PPS material data come from Angioni.
Until Watan learned how to weave, she sustained herself and her family through farming.
Usually, the thickness of the fabric depends on length density of yarns from warp and weft, the degree of crimping of yarns and technological density in the weave. These parameters influence the mass surface unit.
I for one definitely don't wear a weave to hide my "ugly hair" as the author of the article might put it.
One of my most common questions is, of course, "Why do you wear a weave?" Most women say it is more manageable, it takes up less time in the morning and so on.
We have grown up seeing our grandmother, mother, aunts and cousins weave. It was the most normal thing for us to do," Boro said, when asked how she got into the trade.
Layer to layer weave structure was found to have higher strength and moduli (in warp) as well as strength as compared to orthogonal and angle interlock weaves.
Beginners don't have to master the daunting task of setting up the frame with dozens of vertical or warp threads before starting to weave. Wakabayashi sets up the looms in her studio ahead of time; her students choose their weaving threads from a generous stockpile of bright colors and textures.
Take another long strand of vine and weave it in and out along the circle until you have used up that piece.
Would you want that supermodel look, a weave style with really l-o-o-o-n-g spiral curls?
Upon completing the seminar, stylists are encouraged to market their own business using Ellis' tools of the weave trade.
Learning to twist plant and animal fibers into stringlike yarns enabled prehistoric people to weave nets, baskets, and other objects that eased the chores of everyday life, Barber explains in her extensive writings.
I don't want to weave into any world, het or gay, at the cost of losing the lesbian world.
"Edge weave" is a sudden change in melt-curtain width, which occurs when the melt strength of the curtain is reduced either because it gets too hot or because there is a sudden change in output due to a surge in pressure.