weather the storm

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weather the storm

1. Literally, to remain at one's location during a storm to wait until it passes, as opposed to evacuating. Officials are urging residents not to try to weather the storm. This is a mandatory evacuation event.
2. To endure a period of hardship or disorder. That was the hardest year of my life, but in the end I was able to weather the storm with the support of my family.
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

 
1. Fig. to experience and survive a storm. We decided to stay in the building and weather the storm there with the other visitors.
2. Fig. to experience something and survive it. (Fig. on {2}.) The manager went on another shouting rampage and frightened his assistants. The rest of us stayed in our offices to weather the storm.
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

Survive difficulties, as in If she can just weather the storm of that contract violation, she'll be fine. This expression alludes to a ship coming safely through bad weather. [Mid-1600s]
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

or

ride out the storm

COMMON If you weather the storm or ride out the storm, you survive a difficult situation or period without being seriously harmed by it. The General insists he will not resign and will weather the storm. Both companies have weathered the storm of the current recession better than most. Note: You can also say that you ride the storm. The President will no doubt ride the storm, as he always does.
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

survive a period of difficulty.
See also: storm, weather

ride out/weather the ˈstorm (of something)

manage to survive a difficult period or situation: The government has managed to ride out the recent storm.Many companies are having difficulty weathering the present economic storm.
See also: out, ride, storm, weather

weather the storm, to

To survive hard times. The term, alluding to a ship safely coming through bad weather, has been used figuratively from about 1650. Thomas Macaulay did so in The History of England (1849): “[They] weathered together the fiercest storms of faction.”
See also: weather
References in periodicals archive ?
Fleming has written, edited, or coedited 22 books, including the AMS-published titles Weathering the Storm and The Callendar Effect.
Weather historian and award-winning author Mark McLaughlin presents The Donner Party: Weathering the Storm, a chronicle of how relentless snow storms during the winter of 1847 trapped 81 California-bound pioneers in the High Sierra.
* Ciba-Geigy (C-G) wins NAMA's 1987 Best of Show for its "Weathering The Storm " TV campaign which shows the company's support for the American farmer.
There have been five recessions in the past 35 years, but few higher education systems have been able to develop the processes and resources for weathering the storm. At risk are the quality of academic programs and the ideal of broad affordable access to opportunity.
rose to congratulate New Hampshire Episcopalians for electing an openly gay bishop and for weathering the storm that followed" ["Rescuing Christ From the 'Christians'"].
Property values in the Central Business Districts are weathering the storm better than in the suburban markets generally due to stronger rent and vacancy performance and capital flows.
I CHERISH with pride the place I was born The city on the Mersey once weathering the storm With buildings and houses ravaged by war and so much destruction and the plight of the poor Now everything is changing, something new everyday Bus loads of tourists are coming our way Two beautiful cathedrals and the famous Albert Dock With luxury flats and houses and many places to shop Two football teams we honour for their achievements and their fame They stand with pride on either side and glorify our name The people's laughter hides their tears when tragedy comes their way But they'll stand together through thick and thin to help in any way The endless list of talent adds to Liverpool's fame That's why a Scouser born and bred is proud to bear that name.
In contrast, construction firms with experience in healthcare and education projects are obviously fairing better and weathering the storm. That's not to say that everything is rosy in the industry, but construction companies with expertise in value-engineering and cost reduction capabilities are definitely in greater demand.
"But I do think that people are probably giving smaller amounts." Alton suggests that being more creative in the way organizations go about soliciting donations is the key to weathering the storm. "Instead of concentrating on big donations, we're trying to encourage smaller ones from more people," she says.