weathering


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weather the storm

1. Literally, to remain at one's location during a storm to wait until it passes, as opposed to evacuating. Officials are urging residents not to try to weather the storm. This is a mandatory evacuation event.
2. To endure a period of hardship or disorder. That was the hardest year of my life, but in the end I was able to weather the storm with the support of my family.
See also: storm, weather

weather in

1. To cause someone or something to be stuck inside due to extreme weather conditions. A noun or pronoun can be used between "weather" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. We were so excited for a vacation on the beach, but the monsoon weathered us in the whole time. We've been weathered in for nearly a week in this cabin—I hope the snow melts soon, or we're going to start running out of food!
2. To cause someone or something to be unable to move, operate, or be accessed due to extreme weather conditions. A noun or pronoun can be used between "weather" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. The second, smaller hurricane has weathered in rescue services trying to provide aid to victims of the first one. The entire marina was weathered in by the freak snowstorm, meaning no boats could leave or enter until the snow and ice had been cleared.
See also: weather

weather out

1. To tolerate or endure a storm safely for its duration. A noun or pronoun can be used between "weather" and "out." The national meteorological service has recommended that everyone on the east coast stay indoors to weather out the extreme cold front set to hit the country this weekend. The hurricane descended just as our vacation began, so we had to weather it out in our hotel room the whole time.
2. To tolerate or endure some undesirable, unfortunate, or risky situation for its duration. A noun or pronoun can be used between "weather" and "out." We consolidated a lot of our business structures in an attempt to weather out the economic recession. I know you're finding it tough not being able to find a job, but you just have to weather this out and believe that everything will work out in the end.
3. To force something to be canceled or postponed to a later date. Used primarily in passive constructions. We were worried the game would be weathered out because of the forecast the night before, but we ended up having blue skies that afternoon. The festival was weathered out, having to be pushed back to June.
4. To be exposed in or separated from the surrounding minerals due to the eroding effect of weather. Often used in passive constructions. It's extremely rare to find gemstones in such good conditions that have weathered out naturally.
5. To cause something to be exposed in or separated from the surrounding substances due to the eroding effect of weather. Often used in passive constructions. The extreme conditions in this part of the country has weathered a huge number of fossils out of the shale—more than any other location in the world. You can tell by these marks where wind and rain weathered out gold deposits.
See also: out, weather

weather the storm

 
1. Fig. to experience and survive a storm. We decided to stay in the building and weather the storm there with the other visitors.
2. Fig. to experience something and survive it. (Fig. on {2}.) The manager went on another shouting rampage and frightened his assistants. The rest of us stayed in our offices to weather the storm.
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

Survive difficulties, as in If she can just weather the storm of that contract violation, she'll be fine. This expression alludes to a ship coming safely through bad weather. [Mid-1600s]
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

or

ride out the storm

COMMON If you weather the storm or ride out the storm, you survive a difficult situation or period without being seriously harmed by it. The General insists he will not resign and will weather the storm. Both companies have weathered the storm of the current recession better than most. Note: You can also say that you ride the storm. The President will no doubt ride the storm, as he always does.
See also: storm, weather

weather the storm

survive a period of difficulty.
See also: storm, weather

weather in

v.
1. To cause something to be inoperable, inaccessible, or unable to move safely due to adverse weather: This storm will weather the fleet in. The storm could weather in the climbers for days. The squadron is weathered in because of dense fog.
2. To cause something to remain inside due to adverse weather: A northeaster weathered us in for most of our vacation. Bring a book to read in case we get weathered in.
See also: weather

weather out

v.
1. To spend, endure, or survive some storm: We weathered out the storm in a shelter. I'm not sure if we will evacuate the area or stay here and weather the storm out.
2. To force the cancellation or postponement of some event because of adverse weather: Our flight was scheduled for 6:00, but the storm weathered it out. The picnic was weathered out.
3. To spend, endure, or survive something: I weathered out five tours in Vietnam. The first weeks of school are difficult, but you'll weather them out.
4. To become exposed by the erosion of surrounding material: Some of the dinosaur bones remain embedded in the rock, while others are lying on the surface where they weathered out. We found many geodes that had weathered out and were lying in the sand.
5. weather out of To become separated from some surrounding material by the erosive effects of weather: The holes are where hematite has weathered out of the sandstone. We found gold that had weathered out of a vein upstream.
See also: out, weather
References in periodicals archive ?
Still another reason to submit products to weathering tests is to ensure that improper processing does not compromise in-service durability.
Though the PVC was stabilized for initial processing and normal weathering, the welding process caused thermal degradation at the butt joints that resulted in severe yellowing and cracking upon outdoor exposure.
There are three main types of weathering tests: natural, accelerated outdoor, and laboratory.
These changes would have dramatically hastened the chemical weathering rate, according to Volk and Schwartzman's calculations, which they describe in the Aug.
The researchers also think the development of trees, grasses and other vascular plants that increase chemical weathering would have further cooled the Earth.
Furthermore, Potts explains that Olduvai animal bones displaying all stages of weathering have previously been found to contain both the tooth marks of carnivores and the cut marks of hominid tools.