weather the storm


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weather the storm

1. Literally, to remain at one's location during a storm to wait until it passes, as opposed to evacuating. Officials are urging residents not to try to weather the storm. This is a mandatory evacuation event.
2. To endure a period of hardship or disorder. That was the hardest year of my life, but in the end I was able to weather the storm with the support of my family.
See also: storm, weather
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

weather the storm

 
1. Fig. to experience and survive a storm. We decided to stay in the building and weather the storm there with the other visitors.
2. Fig. to experience something and survive it. (Fig. on {2}.) The manager went on another shouting rampage and frightened his assistants. The rest of us stayed in our offices to weather the storm.
See also: storm, weather
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

weather the storm

Survive difficulties, as in If she can just weather the storm of that contract violation, she'll be fine. This expression alludes to a ship coming safely through bad weather. [Mid-1600s]
See also: storm, weather
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weather the storm

or

ride out the storm

COMMON If you weather the storm or ride out the storm, you survive a difficult situation or period without being seriously harmed by it. The General insists he will not resign and will weather the storm. Both companies have weathered the storm of the current recession better than most. Note: You can also say that you ride the storm. The President will no doubt ride the storm, as he always does.
See also: storm, weather
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

weather the storm

survive a period of difficulty.
See also: storm, weather
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ride out/weather the ˈstorm (of something)

manage to survive a difficult period or situation: The government has managed to ride out the recent storm.Many companies are having difficulty weathering the present economic storm.
See also: out, ride, storm, weather
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

weather the storm, to

To survive hard times. The term, alluding to a ship safely coming through bad weather, has been used figuratively from about 1650. Thomas Macaulay did so in The History of England (1849): “[They] weathered together the fiercest storms of faction.”
See also: weather
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
They had not gone above two miles when a violent storm of rain overtook them; and, as they happened to be at the same time in sight of an ale-house, Partridge, with much earnest entreaty, prevailed with Jones to enter, and weather the storm. Hunger is an enemy (if indeed it may be called one) which partakes more of the English than of the French disposition; for, though you subdue this never so often, it will always rally again in time; and so it did with Partridge, who was no sooner arrived within the kitchen, than he began to ask the same questions which he had asked the night before.
Well, I can weather the storm -- I, whom, notwithstanding, you tax with fear -- not with bravado, that is not my way; but I am firm.
Strong enough themselves to weather the storm that was largely their own brewing, they turned loose and plundered the wrecks that floated about them.
(and dreadfully unhappy he is) that he couldn't weather the storm. I should be surprised if he could.
Summary: Washington DC [USA], Dec 10 (ANI): In an unprecedented turn of events, it was revealed that Jared Kushner, the son-in-law of United States President Donald Trump, had reportedly offered advice to Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, widely known as MBS, about how to "weather the storm" following the demise of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
The other evacuees went from Miami to their homes around the U.S., while some students and staff native to the island decided to remain and weather the storm.
While Fine Gael may be able to weather the storm, it seems Eamon Gilmore and his Labour troops are going to take a battering.
He said: "They put us under a lot of pressure so we had to weather the storm and, when called upon, Barry Roche was excellent.
Westlake's "Weather the Storm" program allows customers to sign up for a text message alert system that sends them a text message when the National Weather Service issues a warning for their ZIP code.
WEATHER THE STORM: A friend who changes colors around others is annoying (and probably insecure, too).
Judges were impressed that when faced with the decision to cut costs and weather the storm or take a higher risk route, the company took the most difficult choice and came out on top.
He said the UK is seeing recovery and can weather the storm.
It is hoped, however, that some entity of PeaceArch will continue to weather the storm and survive.
It probably is "the best sector of the economy to weather the storm" of the financial downturn, he said.
LONDON could bear the brunt of the recession while many of England's northern cities weather the storm, a report revealed today.