weasel out


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Related to weasel out: weasel out of something

weasel out (of something)

1. To squeeze out of a narrow space; to slink out (of something). It's a bit tight, but I think I can weasel out of this part of the cave. Stevie got stuck in the tunnel at the playground, but he was eventually able to weasel out.
2. To avoid a situation or responsibility through sly or devious means. Oh no, you're not weaseling out of doing the dishes this time. You can help Grandma later.
3. To elicit something from someone through sly or devious means. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "weasel" and "out." The reporter was known for being able to weasel information out of just about anyone she spoke to. I tried to refuse but eventually they weaseled a donation out of me.
See also: out, weasel
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

weasel out

 (of something)
1. Fig. to squeeze one's way out of something. Somehow, the child managed to weasel out of the hole she was stuck in. The mouse tried to weasel out.
2. Fig. to evade or avoid a job or responsibility. (Fig. on {2}.) Don't try to weasel out of your responsibility! You can't weasel out! You have to do it.
See also: out, weasel
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

weasel out

Back out of a situation or commitment, especially in a sneaky way. For example, I'd love to weasel out of serving on the board. This expression alludes to the stealthy hunting and nesting habits of the weasel, a small, slender-bodied predator. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: out, weasel
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weasel out

v. Slang
1. To back out of some situation or commitment in a selfish or sly manner: The party was boring—you were smart to weasel out early. My cousins weaseled out of contributing to the gift.
2. weasel out of To elicit something from someone by artful or devious means: At first, they wouldn't admit that they were to blame, but I weaseled the truth out of them.
See also: out, weasel
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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