wear off

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wear off

1. To become eroded, ground, or stripped off, as from prolonged exposure to some destructive element or force. The enamel on your teeth has almost completely worn off, which is why you've been experiencing so much pain when you eat and drink. The protective coating I'd applied to the device is beginning to wear off.
2. To erode, grind, or strip off something as a result of prolonged exposure to some destructive element or force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "wear" and "off." The inclement weather in this region tends to wear the paint off of the houses after only a couple of months.
3. To fade or lessen over time; to gradually cease or dissipate. I'm giving you a mild sedative to help you calm down—it should wear off in about an hour. We'll start driving again once your nausea wears off.
See also: off, wear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wear something off (of) something

 and wear something off
to grind or rub something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The grinding of the bottom of the boat on the sandbanks wore the barnacles off the hull. The sand wore off the barnacles.
See also: off, wear

wear off

[for the effects of something] to become less; to stop gradually. The effects of the painkiller wore off and my tooth began to hurt. I was annoyed at first, but my anger wore off.
See also: off, wear

wear off ((of) something)

[for something] to be ground or rubbed away. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The paint has worn off the porch steps. The finish is wearing off.
See also: off, wear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wear off

Diminish gradually, lose effectiveness, as in We'll wait till the drug wears off. [Late 1600s]
See also: off, wear
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wear off

v.
1. To diminish gradually in effect until gone: The drug wore off after eight hours.
2. To be gradually removed by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure: So many people touched the picture that its luster finally wore off.
3. To gradually remove something by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure: The inclement weather wore off the awning on my porch. The snow wore the shine off my car.
See also: off, wear
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When the caffeine wears off, however, the blood vessels dilate again.
For goodness sake, it will phase out when the amusement wears off and people just start ordinary shopping again.
And the euphoria of getting married also wears off because people simply adapt to the feeling.
Director Evy Blaskey said: "Monetary incentives are great, but their value soon wears off. Recognition shows consideration by employers."
On Drag, lang is inhaling all over the place--flying on the high of love's fix, bottoming out when the buzz wears off, but refusing to pass judgment on either altered state.
Also, because the particles are built like onions, with up to 20 concentric layers, the particles retain their roundness even when some material wears off.
As the inebriant of the power of plastic wears off, sophisticated consumers need to carefully review the costs and benefits associated with these cards.
The spray, which forms an invisible film on your skin, allows the wound to heal naturally and wears off after several days.
It should last six months before it wears off completely, although the effects will start to soften after about four months.
REFEREE John Anderson, a top Scots athletics coach, has warned that some Gladiators could land on skid row when their fame wears off.
Aileen said outside Los Angeles Superior Court yesterday: "As the shock wears off and reality sets in, the pain increases."