weary

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Related to wearily: haughtily, enigmatically, wantonly

(there's) no rest for the weary

One must continue to toil or work regardless of how exhausted one is. A logical variant of the original phrase "no peace for the wicked." Parents of young children know all too well what it's like to have only a few hours of sleep and still have to get up a the crack of dawn—no rest for the weary, as my granny always said. There won't be time for a break, because we'll need to get going on the next phase of the project as soon as this one is done. No rest for the weary!
See also: no, rest, weary

(there's) no peace for the weary

One must continue to toil or work regardless of how exhausted one is. A logical variant of the original phrase "no peace for the wicked." Parents of young children know all too well what it's like to have only a few hours of sleep and still have to get up a the crack of dawn—no peace for the weary, as my granny always said. There won't be time for a break, because we'll need to get going on the next phase of the project as soon as this one is done. No peace for the weary!
See also: no, peace, weary

weary (one) with (something)

To bore, exasperate, or exhaust one with some constant, tedious action. The kids have been wearying me with their requests to go to Disneyland. He would weary you with all his political ramblings!
See also: weary

weary of (something)

To become bored, exhausted, or exasperated by something. I'm starting to weary of all his pretentious literary talk. I could tell the kids were wearying of the guided tour.
See also: of, weary

There is no rest for the weary.

Prov. Even people who are worn-out must continue to work. (Describes a situation in which a tired person has to do more work.) By the time I finished doing the laundry, it was so late I had to begin cooking supper for the family. There is no rest for the weary.
See also: no, rest, there, weary

weary of someone or something

to become tired of or bored with someone or something. I am beginning to weary of you. Isn't it time you were going? We soon wearied of chicken twice a week.
See also: of, weary

weary someone with something

to tire or bore someone with something. He wearied her with his constant requests. Please don't weary me with your complaints.
See also: weary

weary of

v.
To lose patience with or interest in something or someone: I soon wearied of their constant bickering.
See also: of, weary

no rest for the weary (wicked)

No peace and quiet for anyone; to be kept very busy. This term, dating from about 1900, today is used facetiously by or about a person who simply is kept very busy. It presumably echoes several biblical passages stating that God will take care of good people but will provide no peace for evildoers (Isaiah 48:22 and 57:21). Wicked is used more in Britain, weary in America. After a two-foot snowfall and predictions of at least another foot of snow, meteorologist Michael Henry said, “There’s no rest for the weary. Just when they . . . cleaned up after the last storm, here comes another” (Boston Globe, March 9, 2001).
See also: no, rest, weary
References in periodicals archive ?
PREDAPPIO, Italy: Tiptoeing through pigeon droppings in a building where Benito Mussolini once barked orders, the mayor sighs wearily as he recounts his long battle to get agreement on what do with the crumbling structure.
My oldest two boys just wearily accepted this drill, but child three has proved a different beast entirely (albeit quite a cute beast).
I watch the sunset over Cardiff town, With Aneurin Bevan looking sternly down On this Friday evening with revellers About to drink the bars dry And a myriad of shoppers and workers wearily Winding their way back home again, A beggar strokes his beloved dog As I hand him change in a doorway, A million miles from the opulent lives Of some of those passing him by, The castle seems to be on fire With clouds rising high as if smoke As I watch the sunset over Cardiff town With Aneurin Bevan looking sternly down.
It's alarming news, especially for those of us who thought Lawro's idea of a superlative was to sigh wearily and mutter: "He's not the worst free-kick taker in the world, is he?" Football commentators are apparently the last people on earth who use an abacus - it's always 'dusted down' to help with those 'final-day permutations' - so the Beeb could solve Lawrenson's adjective drought by providing him with another classroom classic: Roget's Thesaurus.
A big-name cast wearily goes through the motions in helmer Barry W.
When asked how it felt to be home, she smiled wearily and said: "I'm exhausted but very happy to be home.
"We spent an hour with them before retiring wearily to bed."
Sergeant Jackson rests wearily as his squad searches a home during a raid in Rawah, a restive Sunni town near the Syrian border.
The champion trainer and owner Clive Smith found themselves in the second spot in the winner's enclosure after Kauto Star was nailed on the opening day of the meeting and were back there again as Master Minded wearily crossed the line 18 lengths in arrears.
Wearily, we shall have to keep on repeating that if all the nations of these islands gained full national status, we should still have to put together some kind of over-arching political structure to deal with things like macroeconomics, a common defence and foreign policy and all sorts of matters of common concern.
So, once more we rise wearily to point out the obvious - a constitutional amendment allowing Congress to criminally punish the "physical desecration" of the American flag isn't needed because no one is out there burning flags.
"Harold, listen," the battered candidate wearily began.
are a hundred years too late, and GMOs [genetically modified organisms] are the wrong target." One would have thought, Lewontin says wearily, that "industrial capitalism ...
"Can you please, he said wearily, "Explain the difference between NAS and SAN to me?" He paused.
"But now I've had enough, dear Antonio Mora, living my life has been like living a thousand lives," Tabucchi's Pessoa sighs wearily before expiring.