wear out one's welcome, to

wear out one's welcome

Fig. to stay too long (at an event to which one has been invited); to visit somewhere too often. Tom visited the Smiths so often that he wore out his welcome. At about midnight, I decided that I had worn out my welcome, so I went home.
See also: out, wear, welcome

wear out one's welcome

Visit for longer than one's host wants, as in She wanted to stay another few days but feared she would wear out her welcome. This expression uses wear out in the sense of "exhaust" or "use up." [Mid-1800s]
See also: out, wear, welcome

wear out (one's) welcome

To visit so often or stay so long as to become a nuisance.
See also: out, wear, welcome

wear out one's welcome, to

To prolong a visit more than one’s host wishes. The ancients claimed that after three days guests and fish are equally stale. In the mid-nineteenth century the present locution was devised, as “an elegant rendering of the vulgar saying, ‘Fish and company stink in three days’” (Notes and Queries, 1869).
See also: out, wear