weaker vessel


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weaker vessel

A woman. The phrase originated in the Bible. I don't care if you think I'm just a weaker vessel—I've trained to fight on the front lines.
See also: vessel
References in periodicals archive ?
Daniel Snowman meets the biographer of Tudors and Stuarts and author of The Weaker Vessel and The Gunpowder Plot.
He tells husbands to honor their wives as "the weaker vessel."
Thus, through her analysis of Hardy's first novel, Desperate Remedies, and his last two, The Well-Beloved and Jude the Obscure, Brady convincingly demonstrates that the narrator "even as he constructs his women in opposition to the standard norm of woman as the weaker vessel, reverts all the more strongly to that same cultural imperative .
William's tactic reduces valuation of Ellen to that of a "weaker vessel" at the same time that it raises her.
In the 'slappy' affair between Ekiti volcanic senator, Abiodun Olujimi and the National Assembly union leader, the female lawmaker as the weaker vessel, should ordinarily have the judging public on her side.
Without actually challenging patriarchy, "the godly woman transcended the negative stereotypes of the weaker vessel" (363).
Quite honestly, I probably would have come out swinging and cussing if I were in the same spot, but I guess that's why GOD placed Maria Lourdes Sereno in that situation and not weaker vessels like me.
Duffy's assertion that the concentration on the murder of women and children seems to suggest to him that it was a modern concern perhaps needs revisiting: concerns for the death of those considered innocents or "weaker vessels" are very much grounded in seventeenth-century world views, rather than in ours.
In a properly calibrated relation ship, that duty flows from love and service to those weaker vessels, but at minimum, it ought to flow from fear of embarrassment among other men for failing to do one's duty.
Diabetic eye disease can progress to a more serious level when damaged blood vessels close off and new, weaker vessels take their place.
The men are urged to treat women, `the weaker vessels', with the honour appropriate to the fact that they are equally heirs of the grace of life, that is, co-inheritors [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of the eternal life which is salvation.
It will upset those who figure women are weaker vessels or not equal to men or not called to ordained ministry.
From Ian Maclean's seminal The Renaissance Notion of Woman (1980) to Sommerville's new and magisterial Sex and Subjection, they have represented the terms in which men understood women, those "weaker vessels" in whose deficiencies it was supposed that God had perfectly realized his purpose in giving man a helpmate.