put (one's) foot in (one's) mouth

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put (one's) foot in (one's) mouth

To unintentionally say something foolish, tactless, or offensive. He just tends to put his foot in his mouth when he's forced to speak for too long, so try to get him off stage as soon as possible. Oh man, did I ever put my foot in my mouth—I just congratulated Sarah's sister on being pregnant. She isn't.
See also: foot, mouth, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

put one's foot in one's mouth

 and put one's foot in it; stick one's foot in one's mouth
Fig. to say something that you regret; to say something stupid, insulting, or hurtful. When I told Ann that her hair was more beautiful than I had ever seen it, I really put my foot in my mouth. It was a wig. I put my foot in it by telling John's secret; he found out.
See also: foot, mouth, put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

foot in one's mouth, put one's

Say something foolish, embarrassing, or tactless. For example, Jane put her foot in her mouth when she called him by her first husband's name. This notion is sometimes put as having foot-in-mouth disease, as in He has a bad case of foot-in-mouth disease, always making some tactless remark. The first expression dates from about 1900. The variant, dating from the mid-1900s, is a play on the foot-and-mouth (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth) disease that afflicts cattle, causing eruptions to break out around the mouth and hoofs.
See also: foot, put
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

put (one's) foot in (one's) mouth

To make a tactless remark.
See also: foot, mouth, put
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

put one's foot in it/one's mouth, to

To make a (verbal) blunder. This term dates from the early eighteenth century and presumably was analogous to stepping where one should not. Jonathan Swift used it in Polite Conversation (1738), “The bishop has put his foot in it,” and a century later the term was defined in a book on slang (1823). Putting one’s foot in one’s mouth is of more recent provenance; it merited a definition in P. W. Joyce’s English As We Speak It (1910): “To a person who habitually uses unfortunate blundering expressions: ‘You never open your mouth but you put your foot in it.’” Today it is sometimes referred to as foot-in-mouth disease.
See also: foot, put, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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