talk turkey

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talk turkey

To discuss something in a frank, straightforward, and serious manner. We don't have much time, so let's dispense with the formalities and start talking turkey. Your proposals so far have been completely laughable, so why don't you get back to me when you're ready to talk turkey?
See also: talk, turkey
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

talk turkey

Fig. to talk business; to talk frankly. Okay, Bob, we have business to discuss. Let's talk turkey. John wanted to talk turkey, but Jane just wanted to joke around.
See also: talk, turkey
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

talk turkey

Speak plainly, get to the point, as in Don't call me until you're ready to talk turkey. This expression allegedly comes from a tale about an Indian and a white man who hunted together and divided the game. When the white man said, "I'll take the turkey and you the buzzard, or you take the buzzard and I the turkey," the Indian replied, "Talk turkey to me." Whether or not this tale had a true basis, the term was recorded in its present meaning by about 1840.
See also: talk, turkey
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

talk turkey

mainly AMERICAN
If people talk turkey, they discuss something in an open and serious way, in order to solve a problem. Suddenly government and industry are talking turkey. Last month the Prime Minister promised a partnership to improve the climate for business. The next day we got a call to say that he wanted to talk turkey. Note: This expression is said to have its origin in an American story about a white man who went hunting with a Native American. They caught several wild turkeys and some other birds. After the trip the white man divided the birds unfairly, keeping the turkeys for himself and giving the Native American the less tasty birds. The Native American protested, saying he wanted to `talk turkey'.
See also: talk, turkey
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

talk turkey

talk frankly and straight-forwardly; get down to business. North American informal
This phrase was first recorded in the mid 19th century, when it generally had the rather different sense of ‘say pleasant things or talk politely’. Although several theories have been put forward, its origins are not clear.
See also: talk, turkey
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

talk ˈturkey

(informal, especially American English) discuss the practical details of something seriously and honestly: Look, Mark, it’s time we talked turkey. How much money can you invest in the company?
See also: talk, turkey
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

talk turkey

tv. to talk serious business; to talk frankly. We’ve got to sit down and talk turkey—get this thing wrapped up. It’s time to talk turkey and quit messing around.
See also: talk, turkey
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

talk turkey

Informal
To speak frankly about the basic facts of a matter.
See also: talk, turkey
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

talk turkey, to

To get to the point, speak plainly. This expression has been ascribed to an apocryphal tale about a white man and an Indian hunting and then dividing the spoils. When the white man suggested, “Either I’ll take the turkey and you the buzzard, or you take the buzzard and I the turkey,” the Indian replied, “Now talk turkey to me.” Whatever the true origin, the term was around by the time Thomas C. Haliburton edited Traits of American Humor (ca. 1840), which stated, “I was plagy apt to talk turkey.”
See also: talk, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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