wayside

(redirected from waysides)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

go by the wayside

To be discarded, ignored, rejected, or set aside in favor of other considerations or more urgent matters. With the war in the Middle East intensifying, the president's plan for environmental reform has increasingly gone by the wayside.
See also: by, wayside

drop by the wayside

1. To step out of a procession and stand nearby (due to not feeling fit to continue). I was supposed to walk in with my classmates, but I started to feel dizzy and dropped by the wayside.
2. To fail to stay at the same level of knowledge or proficiency as others. If you don't do your homework now, it won't be long before you drop by the wayside in this class.
See also: by, drop, wayside

fall by the wayside

1. To fail or fall behind at something. If you don't do your homework now, it won't be long before you fall by the wayside in this class.
2. To be discarded, ignored, rejected, or set aside in favor of other considerations or more urgent matters. With the economy suffering, the president's plan for environmental reform has increasingly fallen by the wayside.
See also: by, fall, wayside

drop by the wayside

 and fall by the wayside 
1. Lit. to leave a march or procession in exhaustion to recover beside the pathway. A few of the marchers dropped by the wayside in the intense heat.
2. Fig. to fail to keep up with others. Many of the students will drop by the wayside and never finish. Those who fall by the wayside will find it hard to catch up.
See also: by, drop, wayside

fall by the wayside

Fail to continue, drop out, as in At first she did well on the tour, but with all the pressure she soon fell by the wayside . This phrase appeared in William Tyndale's translation of the New Testament (1526; Luke 8:5).
See also: by, fall, wayside

fall by the wayside

COMMON
1. If someone falls by the wayside, they fail in something they are doing and give up trying to succeed in it. Players either perform well and deal with the pressure, or fall by the wayside. Only about half of this group will graduate. The rest will fall by the wayside. Note: You can also say that someone falls by the way. Various team members have fallen by the way over the years.
2. If something falls by the wayside, it fails or is forgotten about. His marriage had fallen by the wayside some years earlier. Other proposals fell by the wayside. Parties change over the years as games and dancing fall by the wayside. Note: You can also say that something falls by the way. Bullick said a number of other businesses had fallen by the way for similar reasons. Note: This expression comes from the story of the sower told by Jesus in the Bible. The seed which falls by the wayside and is eaten by birds represents the people who listen to what Jesus says, but are soon tempted by Satan and disregard what they have heard. (Mark 4:4)
See also: by, fall, wayside

fall by the wayside

1 fail to persist in an endeavour or undertaking. 2 be left without attention or help.
In sense 1 the phrase alludes to the biblical parable of the sower in Mark 4:3–20, and in particular to verse 4: ‘And it came to pass, as he sowed, some fell by the way side, and the fowls of the air came and devoured it up’.
See also: by, fall, wayside

fall by the ˈwayside

not be able to continue something that needs effort, discipline, etc.; begin to be dishonest, immoral, etc: 25 students began the course but a number have fallen by the wayside and only 12 will be taking the exam.This is from a story in the Bible in which the seeds that fell by the wayside (= by the side of a path) did not grow.
See also: by, fall, wayside

fall by the wayside

To fail to continue; give up.
See also: by, fall, wayside

go by the wayside

To be set aside or discarded because of other considerations.
See also: by, wayside
References in periodicals archive ?
The OED defines wayside as "The side of a road or path, the land bordering either side of the way.
That he chose not to travel that road, opted instead to become a writer and thus, metaphorically, being stalled by the wayside, benefitted him in the long run as it certainly has us.
Indeed, while he often observes the usual procession of life, he prefers to dally along the wayside, not unlike the tollman in "The Toll-Gatherer's Day" (1837) who has acquired "the wisdom which the passing world scatters along the wayside" (9:207) but who remains by the way as if joining the procession would exact too great a toll.
To bring together the issue of wayside and commerce, I point to the seemingly innocuous sketch titled "David Swan" (1837).
As they resume their way to Boston, Hawthorne evidently wants us to see that the couple has lost this wayside opportunity to save themselves from a declining, loveless life.
In "The Old Manse," Hawthorne deliberately emphasizes the wayside location of the Manse, as if it lay a considerable distance from the public road.
The Scarlet Letter, of course, offers no dreamscape, but features an extended, nuanced exploration of the wayside precinct as a privileged, romanticized site of withdrawal and renewal--even rebirth, however fleeting.
At last they do talk again--with a remarkable lack of reserve on Hester's part--in these precious wayside moments.
The magical, transformative, wayside encounter has not reached its romantic crescendo.
The Anglo-Catholic Imagery that accompanies the couple's sensual beatification in the wayside retreat grows problematic, however, with Hester's attempt to include their child in the afterglow of climactic enchantment.
Despite this unpromising close to Hester and Dimmesdale's single intimate scene in the book, the wayside episode has an unexpected, if somewhat amusing or sardonic, afterlife; for Hester's powerful influence lives on in Dimmesdale in his hyper-energized journey back to Boston, what Hawthorne (probably smilingly) terms the "excitement" of his "feelings" (1:216).