water down

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water down

1. To dilute, usually by literally adding water. That places waters down their drinks. After you added the stock, the soup tasted like it had been watered down. I think you need to let it reduce some more.
2. To weaken or make less effective. The problem with working with a large group is that you end up having to compromise and water down the final product just to make every one happy. I wish they wouldn't water down these films—audiences are sophisticated enough to understand a complex story without the main character having to spell it out.
3. To cover a surface with water. Every night after the amusement park closes, workers water down the sidewalk to clean it for the next day.
4. To decrease the value of a stock (or a certain portion of that stock) by making more shares available. You have to be careful that you don't purchase stock that can be watered down without your knowledge.
See also: down, water

water something down

 
1. to dilute something. Who watered the orange juice down? Jim watered down the orange juice.
2. to water something thoroughly. Will you water the lawn down tonight? Water down the lawn this evening so it will grow tomorrow.
3. Fig. to reduce the effectiveness or force of something. (Fig. on {2}.) Please don't water my declaration down. The new laws watered down the power of the president.
See also: down, water

water down

Dilute or weaken, as in He watered down that unfavorable report with feeble excuses. [Mid-1800s]
See also: down, water

water down

v.
1. To dilute or weaken something by adding water: The dishonest bartender watered down the liquor. The cook watered the sauce down.
2. To decrease the value of a share of stock, or the value of some group of shares, by increasing the number of shares available for sale: Investors are concerned that stock option grants will water down their holdings. I hope that decision doesn't water the stock values down.
3. To reduce the strength or effectiveness of something: In the end, the legislation was watered down by multiple amendments. The speaker watered his message down with lots of boring stories.
4. To wet the surface of something entirely: The fire department watered down the houses near the brush fire. The road crew watered the dusty road down.
See also: down, water
References in periodicals archive ?
Six weeks later, officers returned to test all the spirits on sale and five bottles were found to have been watered down.
While the bill has been significantly watered down, its intent remains, which is to intertwine the talents and resources of the world's best system of higher education with our struggling K-12 public school system.
According to former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, Arthur Levitt, the Volcker rule could be watered down following intense lobbying by banking groups.
And the spectacular health benefits from antioxidants in tea and wine really needed to be watered down.
The irony is, The Washington Monthly has learned, that the series on low morale which raised the secretarys ire had already been watered down by the paper's editors.
Six weeks later, officers returned and five bottles were found to have been watered down.
not watered down with NDP-oriented social justice or Mother Earth issues.
Although wary senators watered down Johnson's proposal before it was approved as part of the education bill (S.
But it has emerged the promises have been watered down - leaving Hague open to attack from Labour.
It is not a watered down version of a smaller drink, but rather a double blast of fuel with high-energy liquid replenishment.
Amidst speculation that Basel III norms would be watered down because of intense lobbying by banks, a top Spanish official has announced that provisions under Basel III would be implemented without any change.
Only replicated, albeit in no way watered down for the tour.
That's because 21 states have concocted watered down no-fault systems--fake no-fault--that in some cases is worse than the tort system it replaces.