warn of (someone or something)

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warn of (someone or something)

1. To provide information in advance about some potential source of harm, danger, or trouble. Analysts have been warning of a likely downturn in the economy for months now, so this dip in the market shouldn't come as a surprise. Police are warning of a number of escaped inmates who are at large in the area.
2. To caution someone about something; to inform someone of the risks or dangers of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "warn" and "of." My mom always warns me of the dangers of texting while driving. I wish someone has warned me of her kleptomania before we started dating.
See also: of, warn

warn someone of something

to advise someone that something bad is likely to happen. I wish you had warned us of what was going to happen. Please warn John of the heavy traffic he may run into.
See also: of, warn

warn of

v.
To make someone aware in advance of some actual or potential harm, danger, or evil: The doctor warned them of the flu epidemic. The employees were warned of the company's impending bankruptcy.
See also: of, warn
References in classic literature ?
It teaches us a lesson of humility, by impressing us with the imperfection of human powers, and by warning us of the many weak points where we are open to the attack of the great enemy of our race; it proves to us that we are in danger of being weak, when our vanity would fain soothe us into the belief that we arc most strong; it forcibly points out to us the vainglory of intellect, and shows us the vast difference between a saving faith and the corollaries of a philosophical theology; and it teaches us to reduce our self-examination to the test of good works.
How on earth did we ever survive as a human race without these hand wringing, fretting, wimpy, so called experts warning us of every weather condition we seem to get.
In Pentrebane we had numerous leaflets warning us of what would happen.
Like the Reader's Digest series, these books provide us with an organic understanding of our bodies, but they do so by uncovering how our eating connects us to the rest of creation and by warning us of the vices of an industrial agriculture threatening our bodies and the environment.
Many of the same "scientists" now warning us about global warming were warning us of the 'coming' ice age about 30 years ago."
His field-based, interdisciplinary approach to research and teaching remains the standard for sound ecological scholarship, warning us of the dangers of a narrow disciplinary education: "Education, I fear, is learning to see one thing by going blind to another." For those yet to discover Aldo Leopold, this biography is a wonderful way to begin a special journey, to be followed by Leopold's A Sand County Almanac and Susan Flader's Thinking Like a Mountain.