warm and fuzzy


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warm and fuzzy

1. noun A highly sentimental, reassuring, and comforting emotional response. Sometimes hyphenated. If all you want out of a relationship is a constant source of the warm and fuzzies, then you are going to have a hard time finding meaningful, long-term connections with people. I got such warm-and-fuzzies from visiting the lake house again after so many years.
2. noun A thing or situation designed to provoke or evoke such an emotional response. Sometimes hyphenated. Toys that people grow up with tend to become a sort of warm-and-fuzzy for them later in life.
3. adjective Particularly sentimental, reassuring, and comforting, as of an emotional response. Sometimes hyphenated. My dad was never a warm-and-fuzzy type of guy, but, in his own way, he always let us know that he loved us. I love this movie, it always gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling whenever I watch it.
See also: and, fuzzy, warm

warm and fuzzy

Friendly, affectionate, amiable. Originally used to describe a textile fabric that was literally warm and fuzzy, the term began to be used figuratively by the 1930s. Lee Child used it in Persuader (2003), “‘You still feel all warm and fuzzy about this Gorowski guy?’ She nodded. ‘It would be a tragedy to bust him.’”
See also: and, fuzzy, warm
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus did not say to Simon Peter: "Thou art Warm and Fuzzy, and upon this feeling of indiscriminate affirmation I will build my Church.
The Chapman brothers' puerile toy-soldier fantasies and Darger's nigh-pedophiliac perversions could have made a genuinely interesting intervention under the sign "Almost Warm and Fuzzy," while Friedman, Kelley, Dingle, et al.