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press on

1. To apply physical force or pressure to something, typically with one's fingers. Next, press on the big red button—that should reset it. What about here? Does it hurt when I press on it? This part is out of place, which is making this piece press on the fan.
2. To continue or try to do something with determination, especially when facing hardships or setbacks. It was discouraging to learn that our budget had been cut, but we pressed on in the hopes of recovering our investment costs. We have to press on. We've come too far to turn back now!
See also: on, press

press onward

To continue or try to do something with determination, especially when facing hardships or setbacks. It was discouraging to learn that our budget had been cut, but we pressed onward in the hopes of recovering our investment costs. We have to press onward. We've come too far to turn back now!
See also: onward, press

ward off

To push back or defend against someone or something that is advancing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ward" and "off." How will we ward off all these attackers? If you feel like you're getting a cold, these vitamin C tablets should help you to ward it off. These talismans were thought to ward off evil spirits.
See also: off, ward

make (one's) way to(ward) (something or some place)

To navigate or find one's way to or toward something or some location. Passengers, please make your way toward the exit in an orderly fashion. I'm making my way to New York City by car.
See also: make, way

monkey wards

slang A nickname for Montgomery Ward & Company, commonly called "Montgomery Ward's," a mail order retailer and department store chain. Sometimes capitalized. My grandfather had worked in monkey wards all his life until the company went bankrupt in 1997. I'll never forget the pile of massive catalogs my aunt kept in the corner of her living room. She said they were from Monkey Wards, which always made me laugh.
See also: monkey, ward

gravitate to(ward) (someone or something)

To tend to move toward or show interest in some person, place, or thing, as if being pulled by a magnetic force. Teenagers always seem to gravitate to rebellious behavior—it's not something that's unique to your son. I just gravitate toward those kinds of artsy movies, I can't help it. The kids always seem to gravitate to Aunt Joan whenever the whole family gets together.
See also: gravitate

press on something

to push or depress something, such as a button, catch, snap, etc. Press on this button if you require room service. Don't press on this because it rings a loud bell.
See also: on, press

press on(ward)

to continue; to continue to try. Don't give up! Press onward! I have lots to do. I must press on.
See also: on, press

press something (up)on someone

to urge or force something on someone; to try to get someone to accept something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) He always presses second helpings upon his guests. She pressed a gift on us that we could not refuse.
See also: on, press

press (up)on someone or something

to put pressure on someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) The crowd pressed upon the child, squeezing out all his breath. The load presses on your car's springs very heavily.
See also: on, press

ward someone or something off

to hold someone or something off; to fight someone or something off. The army was able to ward the attackers off repeatedly. We couldn't ward off the attackers any longer.
See also: off, ward

ward off

1. Turn aside, parry, as in He tried to ward off her blows. [Second half of 1500s]
2. Try to prevent, avert, as in She took vitamin C to ward off a cold. [Mid-1700s]
See also: off, ward

press on

v.
1. To apply direct pressure to something: I pressed on the edge of the table, and it tipped over.
2. To continue doing something with determination and despite setbacks: Despite their exhaustion, the climbers pressed on toward the summit.
See also: on, press

ward off

v.
1. To try to prevent; avert: You should take vitamins to ward off infections.
2. To turn something aside; repel: The champion boxer warded off the opponent's blows. The flies were annoying me, but I warded them off.
See also: off, ward

monkey wards

n. Montgomery Wards, a department store chain. (The first mail- order house, it operated through the entire twentieth century. It now operates online.) I get that kind of stuff at monkey wards.
See also: monkey, ward