wanting


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find (something) wanting

To discover or determine that someone or something is deficient in certain or overall requirements, expectations, or standards. The report found the government's stimulus plan wanting in several key areas. Though impressed by his application letter, the firm found his C.V. wanting. Mary was found wanting in basic social etiquette by her peers.
See also: find, wanting

want to curl up and die

To wish one could have an escape or some instant relief from being mortified or extremely embarrassed. Hershel just asked me out in the middle of class in front of everyone. I want to curl up and die. After my presentation, I realized my fly had been down the whole time, and I wanted to curl up and die.
See also: and, curl, die, up, want

want for (something)

To lack something. Please don't get the kids any more toys, Mom—they really want for nothing.
See also: want

want no part in/of (something)

To not want any involvement or role in something. For someone who wants no part in this trip, you sure are talking about it a lot.
See also: no, of, part, want

want none of it/that

To refuse to accept something or to not want any involvement in something. I heard your proposal and I want none of it. Count me out. I've heard that reasoning before and I want none of that in my house.
See also: none, of, that, want

want rid of somebody/something

To wish to no longer be responsible for, associated with, or affected or by someone or something. Though many senators made it clear they wanted rid of the candidate before the election began, now that she has surged in popularity, those same senators are now embracing her. I really want rid of this restaurant—it's been nothing but a financial sinkhole since we bought it.
See also: of, rid, somebody, something, want

want (one's) bread buttered on both sides

1. To want to benefit or profit from two or more separate and often contradictory or incompatible things or sources. In trying to strike a trade deal with the two nations, it's clear that the prime minister wants his bread buttered on both sides. The CEO wants her bread buttered on both sides, secretly investing in oil companies while publicly backing green energy initiatives to gain popular support.
2. To desire easy prosperity, success, or wealth without having to make sacrifices or put in the necessary effort. Kids these days want their bread buttered on both sides. They expect high-paying jobs like it's their birthright, but they aren't willing to work their way to the top!
See also: both, bread, butter, on, side, want

want none of (something)

To refuse to tolerate, accept, or participate in something. I was going to move back home with my girlfriend, but my parent's were having none of it. I'm having none of this plan—find someone else to finance your schemes.
See also: none, of, want

want the D

vulgar slang To be sexually interested in a man. "D" is short for "dick," a slang term for a penis. Did you see the flirty texts she sent me? She totally wants the D.
See also: want

want for nothing

To be in no great need of anything; to not lack anything, whether a necessity or a comfort. We weren't rich or anything growing up, but we were happy, healthy, and wanted for nothing. I always figured someone earning that much money would want for nothing, but I guess there are some things money can't buy.
See also: nothing, want

want in

1. To wish to enter (some place). A: "What's that scratching noise?" B: "Oh, the dog just wants in."
2. To desire to be included in or a part of something. I know you all are cooking up some scheme to rob this place, and I want in! You have to prove the potential of your company before investors will want in.
3. To desire or require that someone or something be present some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "want" and "in." We have a busy day tomorrow, so I want all of you in by 8 AM at the latest. The staff all want a coffee machine in the employee lounge.
4. To desire that someone else be included or participate in something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "want" and "in." Often followed by "on (something)." I've got a great idea for a movie, and I want you in it! We want only the best and brightest in on our newest project.
See also: want

want out

1. To wish to exit or leave (some place). Sorry, this steam room is too hot for me, I want out! A: "Why is the dog scratching on the door like that?" B: "Oh, he just wants out."
2. To desire to depart or be excluded from something, such as a project, plan, undertaking, etc. This heist is going to be way too dangerous—I want out. More and more investors have been wanting out as the company's latest product fails to gain any traction in the market.
3. To wish to no longer be in a relationship. I just hate being constrained by a boyfriend's expectations and demands, and I invariably want out of the relationship after the first year or so.
4. To desire or require that someone or something leave some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "want" and "in." Your friends have been nothing but trouble since they arrived—I want them out of the house, now! The boss said he wants any personal equipment out of the office by Friday.
5. To desire that someone else be excluded or removed from something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "want" and "in." Often followed by "on (something)." The board of directors made it clear that they want the acting CEO out as soon as possible. If they want me out, they're going to have to fire me.
See also: out, want

want the first crack at (something)

To have the first chance to do something. Is it true? Does that studio really want the first crack at my script?
See also: crack, first, want

want for nothing

Fig. not to lack anything; to have everything one needs or desires. The Smiths don't have much money, but their children seem to want for nothing. Lisa's husband spoils her. She wants for nothing.
See also: nothing, want

want in (something)

 and want into (something)
to want to come into something or some place. It's cold out here! I want into the house. The dog wants in.
See also: want

want out

 (of something)
1. to desire to get out of something or some place. I want out of this stuffy room. Where's the door? I want out.
2. Fig. to desire to be relieved of a responsibility. I want out of this responsibility. I don't have the time to do it right. This job is no good for me. I want out.
3. Fig. to want to remove oneself from some association or relationship. I want out. This relationship is stifling me.
See also: out, want

want someone or something in something

to desire that someone or something be in something or some place. I want you in my office immediately. I want some coffee in this room now!
See also: want

want for nothing

Not lack any necessities or comforts, as in He saw to it that his mother wanted for nothing. This term uses want in the sense of "lack." "Mid-1600s"
See also: nothing, want

want in

1. Desire to enter, as in The cat wants in. The antonym is want out, as in The dog wants out. [First half of 1800s]
2. Wish to join a business, project, or other undertaking, as in Some investors want in but have not yet been admitted. Again, the antonym is want out, as in Many Quebec residents want out of Canada. [Mid-1900s]
See also: want

want for ˈnothing

have everything you need or want: They both earn good salaries so their children want for nothing.
See also: nothing, want

want ˈrid of somebody/something

(British English, spoken, informal) want to be free of somebody/something that has been annoying you or that you do not want: Are you trying to say you want rid of me?
See also: of, rid, somebody, something, want

want in

v. Slang
1. To desire entrance: The dog wants in.
2. To wish to join a project, business, or other undertaking: Ever since they've seen our success, they all want in. I want in on the deal.
3. To desire that someone join a project, business, or other undertaking: Do you want me in on this project or not?
See also: want

want out

v. Slang
1. To desire to leave: The cat wants out. I want out of this city.
2. To desire to leave a project, business, or other undertaking: The recruit wanted out after realizing how risky the venture was. I want out of this program.
3. To desire that someone or something leave a project, business, or other undertaking: The boss wanted those employees out after they messed up the project.
See also: out, want

want out

in. to want to remove oneself from some association or relationship. Ted had had as much as he could stand, and he wanted out.
See also: out, want
References in periodicals archive ?
WANTING THE JOB: "I was 16 when I first realized that I wanted to have a career in public service.
As expected, the lowest rating came from those neither holding nor wanting the PFS accreditation; they also perceived both the experience requirement and the potential increase in legal liability as greater costs than did the PFS group.
Like Bruner and many others wanting to break into advertising, Fischer, 21, said that before he came up with the idea to wear a company logo on his face, he was simply trying to find a unique approach to marketing.
Only a handful of open enrollment requests cited a school's athletic programs as the reason for wanting the transfer, Allmandinger said.
He's totally preoccupied with physically not wanting to be hurt.
She thought it was an earthquake, and her neighbors in and around the 4200 block of Blackwood Street where she lives rushed out of their homes, bewildered and wanting to know what had happened.
To qualify, the candidates have to demonstrate they are taking a new direction in their lives and are not just wanting to take off one tattoo to put on another or prevent authorities from identifying them.
As far as wanting to come back, who wants to go through this again?