wane

(redirected from waning)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to waning: Waning moon

be on the wane

To be decreasing or lessening. Thank goodness this storm is finally on the wane—I can't tolerate another day of rain. The group's power in this region is on the wane, but that doesn't mean another faction won't step in.
See also: on, wane

on the wane

Beginning to decrease or lessen; in a period of decline. Thank goodness this storm is finally on the wane—I can't tolerate another day of rain. Though on the wane in recent years, the director was once a juggernaut of the film industry.
See also: on, wane

wax and wane

To alternatingly increase (wax) and decrease (wane). My fortune has waxed and waned over the years, but I live simply anyway, and it has never affected me much. Voter turnout waxes and wanes depending on which positions are up for election.
See also: and, wane, wax

on the wane

becoming less; fading away. Her influence in on the wane, but she is still the boss.
See also: on, wane

wax and wane

Fig. to increase and then decrease, as the phases of the moon. As the moon waxes and wanes, so does the height of the tide change. Voter sentiment about the tax proposal waxes and wanes with each passing day.
See also: and, wane, wax

wax and wane

Increase and decrease, as in size, number, strength, or intensity, as in Enrollments in these programs wax and wane from year to year. This expression alludes to the phases of the moon, with its periodic changes in size. It was first recorded in the 1300s.
See also: and, wane, wax

wax and wane

undergo alternate increases and decreases.
2002 New York Times The level of security that people are psychologically able to accept changes as crisis situations wax and wane.
See also: and, wane, wax

be on the ˈwane

(written) be becoming smaller or less strong: Their political power is on the wane.
When the moon is on the wane it appears smaller in the sky.
See also: on, wane

ˌwax and ˈwane

(literary) increase then decrease in strength, importance, etc. over a period of time: The government’s popularity has waxed and waned over the past year.
These two verbs describe the changing shape of the moon in the sky. When the moon waxes, more of it is visible, and when it wanes we see less of it.
See also: and, wane, wax

on the wane

In a period of decline or decrease: "The tide was near the turn and already the day was on the wane" (James Joyce).
See also: on, wane
References in periodicals archive ?
Lunar believers like me reckon, just like the Ancient Greeks and Romans did, that a month is divided into four seven-day quarters, depending on whether the moon is new, waxing, full, or waning. It is the gravitational pull of the moon, which changes as it waxes and wanes, which influences all life on earth.
Consultant psychiatrist Dr Ian Pennell said: "She had a perception of a waning career and uncertainties about how she would support herself in the future." Verdict: Suicide.
If it looks like a "D" it should be "decroissant" (decreasing or waning).
William H Bouwsma, The Waning of the Renaissance, 1550-1640.
Waxing and waning, even flipping direction, the sun's magnetic field undergoes dramatic upheavals yet always returns to its original shape and position.
Waning forest frogs include Ascaphus truei and several types of the leaf-breeding Plethodon.