waltz in(to some place)

(redirected from waltzing in)

waltz in(to some place)

To enter (some place, establishment, or event) in a particularly casual, carefree manner. He came waltzing into class nearly 20 minutes late, acting as if nothing were out of the ordinary. I've spent my entire life training to be where I am, and this young kid just waltzes in like it's a hobby of his.
See also: waltz
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

waltz in(to some place)

Fig. to step or walk into a place briskly and easily. She waltzed into the room and showed off her ring. Eric waltzed in and said hello.
See also: waltz
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

waltz in

v.
To enter briskly, without hesitation, and with self-confidence: He waltzes in every morning at 9:30 and doesn't care what his boss thinks.
See also: waltz

waltz into

v.
1. To move briskly, without hesitation, and with self-confidence into some place: I hate how she always waltzes into the office 30 minutes late.
2. To lead or force someone to move briskly and purposefully into some place: The teacher waltzed the troublemakers into the principal's office.
See also: waltz
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Six in the morning saw Bobby at the Tonga Office in the drenching rain, the whirl of the last waltz still in his ears, and an intoxication due neither to wine nor waltzing in his brain.
Tiny and Lena, Antonia and Mary Dusak, were waltzing in the middle of the floor.
"Come and join us for the Beautiful Blue Danube and many more surprises - I want to see everyone waltzing in the cinema aisles."
Waltzing in the Dark: African-American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era, a new book by Brenda Dixon Gottschild, deals with the artistic, social, and racial climate for African-American vaudevillians working from the late 1920s through the 1940s.
Waltzing in formal lines to Willems's low, melodious tones, shoulders turning in epaulement, dancers continually detach themselves from and rejoin the group, demonstrating Forsythe's ability to counterpoint formal construction against its dissolution.