walk off with (something)

(redirected from walked off with)

walk off with (something)

1. To win easily. Our opponents walked off with a victory because we were so unprepared for that game.
2. To steal something. Someone at the party must have walked off with my purse because I can't find it anywhere.
See also: off, walk

walk off with

1. Also, walk away with. Win easily, as in Our team walked off with the pennant, or He expected a tough opponent, but to his surprise he walked away with first place. [First half of 1800s]
2. Steal, as in Someone walked off with my suitcase. [Early 1700s]
See also: off, walk
References in classic literature ?
Such was the discernment of Mrs Wilkins, and such the respect she bore her master, under whom she enjoyed a most excellent place, that her scruples gave way to his peremptory commands; and she took the child under her arms, without any apparent disgust at the illegality of its birth; and declaring it was a sweet little infant, walked off with it to her own chamber.
It was during the afternoon performance, and the big tent was filled with women and children, when I went looking for Red Denny, the head canvas-man, who had walked off with my pocket-knife.
He walked off with the loot - part of pounds 1million in cash being carried on the short Caribbean flight.
Kenny Lofton, who had doubled with one out, scored easily, and the Dodgers walked off with a 5-4 win over the Milwaukee Brewers in front of 46,087 fans at Dodger Stadium.
Dad-of-four Les, 39, said: "I hope whoever walked off with my money feels guilty and is cursed with bad luck.
The bear knocked over two, picked up the third and walked off with it.
He also walked off with the Les Haserot Award, given to a top player who exemplifies the former Fremont coach's desire for a job well done.
When Madonna finished giving the award, she walked behind the people when all the other presenters walked off with them.
He also rushed for 44 yards on seven attempts and walked off with a game ball.
He grabbed it and walked off with the ball gripped securely in his hands - hands that would later become the surest in a program that calls itself Wide Receiver University.