walk into the lion's den

walk into the lion's den

To enter into a particularly dangerous, hostile, or oppressive place or situation, especially due to an angry or sinister person or group of people within it. I felt like I was walking into the lion's den when I went in front of the board for my annual review.
See also: den, walk

walk into the lion's den

COMMON If you walk into the lion's den, you deliberately place yourself in a dangerous or difficult situation. Confident that he had done no wrong, the Minister last night walked into the lion's den of his press accusers, looked them in the eye, and fought back. Note: Other verbs such as go, step, or venture can be used instead of walk. We need to win tonight's game, but we are going into the lion's den without one of our key men. Note: You can also say that someone is thrown or sent into the lion's den if they are put in a difficult or dangerous situation. She was eagerly accepted by the teaching agency, and thrown straight into the lion's den at a tough comprehensive school in Surrey. Note: This expression comes from the story in the Bible of Daniel, who was thrown into a den of lions because he refused to stop praying to God. However, he was protected by God and the lions did not hurt him. (Daniel 6)
See also: den, walk
References in periodicals archive ?
Taylor is relishing the chance to walk into the lion's den at the Stadium of Light again, and has no problem with being on the receiving end of some abuse from the home supporters.
HEARTS star Ian Black will walk into the lion's den at Ibrox tonight vowing not to wind up El-Hadji Diouf.
She says it would make my grandma's day if I was there but I still don't want to walk into the lion's den.
Shay Given spurned an Irish knees-up to report for training with Newcastle United today ( and ready to walk into the lion's den which is the Emirates Stadium on Saturday.
Now Eck's preparing to walk into the lion's den on Wednesday with little chance of finding the home support in a charitable festive spirit.
He helped persuade William Donaldson, the CEO of Aetna, to walk into the lion's den, the GSMS House of Delegates' meeting, to address an audience of hostile Connecticut physicians.