walk away from (someone or something)

walk away from (someone or something)

1. To abandon someone or something; to leave some person or thing without meeting or incurring any obligations. Luckily we were able to walk away from the deal before any money had changed hands. You can't just walk away from your family like that, Steven—you have responsibilities to us!
2. To come through the other side of an event or situation without suffering any harm or repercussions. How on earth did he walk away from a train crash of that scale with just a few scrapes and bruises? This is the fourth time he's walked away from a company he helped drive into the ground without losing so much as a penny of his own money.
See also: away, walk

walk away from someone or something

 
1. to depart from someone or something on foot. Don't walk away from me while I am talking to you. I walked away from the concert by myself.
2. to abandon someone or something; to go away and leave someone or something. Todd walked away from the problem. I walked away from him and never saw him again.
See also: away, walk

walk away from

1. Survive an accident with little injury, as in They were lucky to walk away from that collision. [Second half of 1900s]
2. Refuse to deal with or become involved, abandon, as in No parent finds it easy to walk away from a child in trouble. [Second half of 1900s]
3. Outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty, as in The Packers are walking away from the other teams in their division. [Slang] Also see walk over.
See also: away, walk

walk away from

1. To outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty: walked away from the competition.
2. To survive (an accident) with very little injury.
3. To refuse to accept (an offer, for example).
4. To decline to continue participation in (a job, relationship, or activity, for example), often abruptly or nonchalantly.
5. To abandon (a property) on which one owes a mortgage, as when the principal of the mortgage exceeds the market value of the house.
See also: away, walk