walk away from


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walk away from

1. To abandon someone or something; to leave some person or thing without meeting or incurring any obligations. Luckily we were able to walk away from the deal before any money had changed hands. You can't just walk away from your family like that, Steven—you have responsibilities to us!
2. To come through the other side of an event or situation without suffering any harm or repercussions. How on earth did he walk away from a train crash of that scale with just a few scrapes and bruises? This is the fourth time he's walked away from a company he helped drive into the ground without losing so much as a penny of his own money.
See also: away, walk

walk away from someone or something

 
1. to depart from someone or something on foot. Don't walk away from me while I am talking to you. I walked away from the concert by myself.
2. to abandon someone or something; to go away and leave someone or something. Todd walked away from the problem. I walked away from him and never saw him again.
See also: away, walk

walk away from

1. Survive an accident with little injury, as in They were lucky to walk away from that collision. [Second half of 1900s]
2. Refuse to deal with or become involved, abandon, as in No parent finds it easy to walk away from a child in trouble. [Second half of 1900s]
3. Outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty, as in The Packers are walking away from the other teams in their division. [Slang] Also see walk over.
See also: away, walk

walk away

v.
1. To leave by or as if by walking: When she saw me, she quickly walked away.
2. To emerge from a dangerous situation without serious injury or penalty: You were lucky to walk away from such a bad car accident. The students could have been expelled for such an offense, but somehow they walked away with only a warning.
3. To leave freely and without obligation: The two sides walked away from the deal when they failed to reach a compromise. With no evidence to hold them on, the officers let the suspects walk away.
4. walk away with To win some prize or award easily or unexpectedly: The film walked away with ten awards.
5. walk away with To steal something: The robbers walked away with $1 million in jewels.
See also: away, walk

walk away from

1. To outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty: walked away from the competition.
2. To survive (an accident) with very little injury.
3. To refuse to accept (an offer, for example).
4. To decline to continue participation in (a job, relationship, or activity, for example), often abruptly or nonchalantly.
5. To abandon (a property) on which one owes a mortgage, as when the principal of the mortgage exceeds the market value of the house.
See also: away, walk
References in periodicals archive ?
This implies that each year since 1997, the likelihood that an offender would walk away from a halfway house decreased by approximately 8.
DAVID FELGATE has hit back at critic John McEnroe, declaring "I'm not going to walk away from Tim Henman.
The strike, he added, shows why Scots should not walk away from England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
We aren't afraid to walk away from a deal," Kliegerman said.
Millwall manager Dennis Wise insists he will not walk away from the club despite a precarious relationship with chairman-elect Jeff Burnige.
He said: ``If you look at the stage I am at in my career, what the hell have I come back for if I am going to walk away from it?
LEE Dixon will walk away from football once his Arsenal contract ends.
It's easier to walk away from a need or a conflict than to deal with it.
The court also noted that the principals may have permitted Langan to perform extensive additional services anticipating that they could walk away from liability as Equinational, which "was and is an entity apparently bereft of all assets.