waifs and strays

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waifs and strays

People or animals that are in need of a place to stay. "Waif" commonly refers to a person or animal that has been abandoned. It's heartbreaking to see so many waifs and strays wandering the city streets, with no one to care of them.
See also: and, stray

ˌwaifs and ˈstrays


1 people with no home, especially children in a big city: There are lots of waifs and strays living on the streets here.
2 (humorous) lonely people with nowhere else to go: My wife is always inviting various waifs and strays from work to our house. She seems to attract them.
See also: and, stray
References in periodicals archive ?
Her father's only heir, The Waif was only six-years-old when her father remarried after her mother's death and it was her stepmother who took care of her until she gave birth with her own child.
love-struck waif half his age who is carrying his child.
The Croydon waif has taken up with the delightfully-named magazine boss Jefferson Hack (inset).
DON'T expect Penny Lancaster to emerge a size-six waif just weeks after becoming a mum.
The sexy waif was spotted by the diary's South American spies downing a few Bellinis at a Buenos Aires bar last week after strutting her stuff on the local catwalk.
color) Mikey Kilker appears as street waif Oliver Twist and Michael Davies plays Mr.
The exhausted waif also received drugs therapy during the three-week stay at the Priory Clinic in London.
The sylphlike waif is making way (again) for the creature with rounded tits and ass and a defined "natural" waist.
The half-starved waif then must have been too tired to walk and got a fit bloke to give her a piggy-back ride.
A waif who's devoted her life to caring for her disabled, demanding and mercifully just departed mother, Nell has a special connection to the house and a fragile psyche that makes her growing understanding of what's going on there appear to be madness.
One recalls Anne Baxter in the beginning of All About Eve, the ingratiating waif in the neat but shabby raincoat, who stands at the door, peering in at the glittering theater people, astutely studying them, like prey, preparing, unbeknownst to anyone, to psychically cannibalize and become them.
Hensley responded to the postings, saying he was ``looking for someone with a young waif look,'' according to detectives.
See, it turns out that men prefer an hourglass shape on women, while the waif look is a definite turn-off.
Now that the waif imago is being unearthed as an operative fashion fantasy, Liza is the key to some of its Hollywood roots.
This healing moment of acceptance is undermined by the obviously brief shelf life of the new faux waif, emphasizing the commoditylike obsolescence of teen looks rather than acceptance of the sublime body of grunge that ages as fabulously as leatherette.