wages of sin, the

the wages of sin (is death)

Immoral or evil behavior only yields bad outcomes or results. Sometimes used ironically or facetiously. From a line in the Bible, meaning in context that living a life of sin will only bring one death of the body and soul, while living a virtuous life as prescribed by the church will lead to eternal happiness. After setting up a business empire built around the exploitation of others, the notorious CEO is finally going to prison, his entire fortune stripped from him and his family. It's true, it seems, that the wages of sin is death. I know that all these cakes are making me gain weight, but I just can't help myself—the wages of sin, I suppose!
See also: of, sin, wage

wages of sin, the

The results or consequences of evildoing, as in She ate all of the strawberries and ended up with a terrible stomachache-the wages of sin, no doubt . This expression comes from the New Testament, where Paul writes to the Romans (6:23): "The wages of sin is death." Today it is often used more lightly, as in the example.
See also: of, wage

wages of sin, the

The consequences for wickedness. The term comes from the Bible, where Paul writes to the Romans, “The wages of sin is death” (6:23). Although numerous later religious writers, including Mary Baker Eddy, echoed this sentiment, in the twentieth century the term is more often used ironically. “The wages of sin and the reward of virtue are not so different,” remarked Joseph Shearing (The Strange Case of Lucile Cléry, 1932), and “The wages of sin is death . . . Don’t trouble whether it’s the real sinner who gets the wages,” wrote H. C. Bailey (The Apprehensive Dog, 1942).
See also: of, wage