wager

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Related to wagering: Wagering contract

lay a wager

1. To make a bet. A: "There's no doubt in my mind that my team will beat yours in the championship!" B: "Oh yeah? Care to lay a wager on that?"
2. To be completely sure of something. I'd lay a wager that Jeremy tries to skip out on paying me back for dinner.
See also: lay, wager

lay odds

1. To offer a bet with favorable odds to other bettors. Bookmakers are laying odds that the company's new smartphone outsells its competitors 2:1.
2. To assert complete certainty about something. I'll lay odds that Jeremy tries to skip out on paying me back for dinner.
See also: lay, odds

wager (someone) a pound to a penny

To be convinced that something is very probable or likely (to happen or be the case). Primarily heard in UK. I've been hearing about layoffs and pay cuts for a while now, but I wager you a pound to a penny that none of the executives see a drop in their salaries. I'd wager a pound to a penny this issue was caused by a computer virus someone accidentally downloaded.
See also: penny, pound, wager

wager on (someone or something)

1. To stake a certain amount of money on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "wager" and "on." I wagered $20 on Tom winning the race. My gambling problem got so severe that I even wagered the keys to my car on a card game one time.
2. To lay bets on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
3. To predict or anticipate that something will happen or prove to be the case. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
See also: on, wager
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wager on someone or something

to bet on someone or something. I wouldn't want to wager on the outcome. I'll wager on Bill, the fastest runner in town.
See also: on, wager

wager something on someone or something

to bet a certain amount of money on someone or something. I'll wager twenty bucks on you. I would never wager anything on that horse!
See also: on, wager
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lay a wager

see under lay odds.
See also: lay, wager

lay odds

Make a bet on terms favorable to the other party, as in I'll lay odds that it will rain before the week is out. [c. 1600] The closely related lay a wager means "make a bet," as in He laid a wager that Don would be late. [c. 1300]
See also: lay, odds
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lay (or give) odds

1 offer a bet with odds favourable to the other person betting. 2 be very sure about something.
The opposite of lay odds in sense 1 is take odds which means ‘offer a bet with odds unfavourable to the other person betting’.
See also: lay, odds
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wager on

v.
1. To place a wager of some amount on some event: I wagered $10 on the first race of the evening.
2. To place a wager of some amount on some participant in an event: I wagered $10 on the Detroit Tigers.
3. To place a wager or bet on some event: I wagered on the last race of the evening but lost.
4. To place a wager or bet on some participant in an event: I wagered on the Chicago Bears and doubled my money.
5. To expect or feel sure that something will happen: You can wager on Chris being late to the meeting.
See also: on, wager
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If the taxpayer is instead considered a recreational gambler, he may still be able to deduct any "losses on wagering transactions," excluding any nonwagering or business transactions, as an itemized deduction, assuming itemizing is feasible.
The provision is intended to clarify that the limitation on losses from wagering transactions applies not only to the actual costs of wagers incurred by an individual, but to other expenses incurred by the individual in connection with the conduct of that individual's gambling activity.
A portion of this projected loss may be mitigated if patrons of greyhound wagering move to wagering on horse racing or jai alai.
Mississippi casinos are NOT going to win $325 million in additional gross gaming revenue due to legal sports wagering. In 2017 Nevada set a record for sports wagering revenues with $248.8 million in GGR from sports betting --and that was with Nevada as essentially the only full service legal sports wagering jurisdiction in the US.
Our computer-assisted bettors differed from the other players because of their higher wagering budgets, more advanced strategies, and potentially better predictions.
CG Technology is an innovative gaming technology solutions provider for lottery, gaming, race and sports wagering worldwide.
However, football wagering in retail has grown in Q3 and the rollout of our new Eclipse gaming machine has begun."
Phortner's patented technology provides for secure money transfer and wagering audit data as required by a well-regulated industry.'
This price theoretically would attract equal amounts of money on each side of the wagering proposition.
Moreover, since 1996, the riverboat casinos have paid about $5.9 billion in wagering taxes and about $1.1 billion in admission taxes.
165(d) states that "losses from wagering transactions shall be allowed only to the extent of the gains from such transactions" but does not provide a technical definition of the terms "gains" and "losses." However, if the statute's language is plain, clear, and unambiguous, the statutory language is to be applied according to its terms, unless a literal interpretation of the statutory language would lead to absurd results.
These classes used a new method of testing called confidence wagering. This paper advocates the position that confidence wagering can predict the accuracy of a student's test answer selection during among-subject assessments.
This new agreement will provide GIG with a share of the wagering revenue from the enhanced play-by-play betting service.
According to Pascal, "wagering for God" and "wagering against God" are contradictories, as there is no avoiding wagering one way or another: "you must wager.
I DISAGREE WITH YOUR DEPICTION OF THE Ezeiza International airport in Buenos Aires in "Wagering on the Weather" in the July 2000 issue.