wager

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lay a wager

1. To make a bet. A: "There's no doubt in my mind that my team will beat yours in the championship!" B: "Oh yeah? Care to lay a wager on that?"
2. To be completely sure of something. I'd lay a wager that Jeremy tries to skip out on paying me back for dinner.
See also: lay, wager

lay odds

1. To offer a bet with favorable odds to other bettors. Bookmakers are laying odds that the company's new smartphone outsells its competitors 2:1.
2. To assert complete certainty about something. I'll lay odds that Jeremy tries to skip out on paying me back for dinner.
See also: lay, odds

wager (someone) a pound to a penny

To be convinced that something is very probable or likely (to happen or be the case). Primarily heard in UK. I've been hearing about layoffs and pay cuts for a while now, but I wager you a pound to a penny that none of the executives see a drop in their salaries. I'd wager a pound to a penny this issue was caused by a computer virus someone accidentally downloaded.
See also: penny, pound, wager

wager on (someone or something)

1. To stake a certain amount of money on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "wager" and "on." I wagered $20 on Tom winning the race. My gambling problem got so severe that I even wagered the keys to my car on a card game one time.
2. To lay bets on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
3. To predict or anticipate that something will happen or prove to be the case. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
See also: on, wager
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

wager on someone or something

to bet on someone or something. I wouldn't want to wager on the outcome. I'll wager on Bill, the fastest runner in town.
See also: on, wager

wager something on someone or something

to bet a certain amount of money on someone or something. I'll wager twenty bucks on you. I would never wager anything on that horse!
See also: on, wager
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lay a wager

see under lay odds.
See also: lay, wager

lay odds

Make a bet on terms favorable to the other party, as in I'll lay odds that it will rain before the week is out. [c. 1600] The closely related lay a wager means "make a bet," as in He laid a wager that Don would be late. [c. 1300]
See also: lay, odds
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lay (or give) odds

1 offer a bet with odds favourable to the other person betting. 2 be very sure about something.
The opposite of lay odds in sense 1 is take odds which means ‘offer a bet with odds unfavourable to the other person betting’.
See also: lay, odds
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wager on

v.
1. To place a wager of some amount on some event: I wagered $10 on the first race of the evening.
2. To place a wager of some amount on some participant in an event: I wagered $10 on the Detroit Tigers.
3. To place a wager or bet on some event: I wagered on the last race of the evening but lost.
4. To place a wager or bet on some participant in an event: I wagered on the Chicago Bears and doubled my money.
5. To expect or feel sure that something will happen: You can wager on Chris being late to the meeting.
See also: on, wager
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We then use the held sensitivity cutoff value from the training set on the testing set to establish the excess returns per dollar wagered for that wager type.
For the crowdsourcing comparison we use pre-race odds where the crowd favorite, the animal with the lowest odds, was selected and wagered upon.
In 1998, approximately $80,000,000 was wagered on the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament with Nevada bookmakers.
At times it seems that what most upsets Goodman is not that hapless gamblers are losing their money, but that increasingly their money is, as he remarked on The News Hour, "going into the pockets of the people who run the gambling companies....Now, essentially, what we've done is privatized a sector of our tax system." Lotteries may be a bad bet for gamblers - they typically return only about half of the money wagered - but at least the money bettors lose goes into the state's coffers.
"Neither player wagered on their own matches and there was no evidence of any intent to affect the outcome of any matches wagered on."
Tuesday's report from the Division of Gaming Enforcement, which oversees the state's sports betting and gambling markets, found the vast majority of wagers were placed via online or mobile services, totaling nearly $259 million, versus the $61 million patrons wagered at brick and mortar casinos or racetracks.
Meanwhile, money wagered on horse racing at Oaklawn has declined.
In a day when some 90 per cent of wagering is off-track, and $1 wagered on-track equals $3 wagered off-track, every available dollar on-track had better be guaranteed delivery.
To give you some idea of what kind of change that represents for players, consider this: Churchill Downs director of mutuels Rick Smith reported that some 50 to 60 per cent of wagering typically comes into the pools in the final minute of wagering and 90 per cent is wagered in the final five minutes prior to a race.
Such changes have not been uncommon simply because of the delay of getting all the money wagered into the pool.
The man, identified as Derrick Davis, wagered a total of $1,152 through a telephone account with the Catskill OTB.
That means only 17 per cent of the total wagered in 1999 was bet on-track.
One player at Lone Star Park near Dallas, Texas, wagered $10,000 on the field, which momentarily took its price down to 1-5 while rendering all others a 50-1 chance or better.