wager on

wager on (someone or something)

1. To stake a certain amount of money on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "wager" and "on." I wagered $20 on Tom winning the race. My gambling problem got so severe that I even wagered the keys to my car on a card game one time.
2. To lay bets on the outcome of some event or a participant thereof, with the ambition of winning money if successful. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
3. To predict or anticipate that something will happen or prove to be the case. I learned long ago not to wager on sporting events—too many weird things can happen in the course of a game. I've always wagered on the 49ers, but I think I want to back the Eagles today.
See also: on, wager

wager something on someone or something

to bet a certain amount of money on someone or something. I'll wager twenty bucks on you. I would never wager anything on that horse!
See also: on, wager

wager on someone or something

to bet on someone or something. I wouldn't want to wager on the outcome. I'll wager on Bill, the fastest runner in town.
See also: on, wager

wager on

v.
1. To place a wager of some amount on some event: I wagered $10 on the first race of the evening.
2. To place a wager of some amount on some participant in an event: I wagered $10 on the Detroit Tigers.
3. To place a wager or bet on some event: I wagered on the last race of the evening but lost.
4. To place a wager or bet on some participant in an event: I wagered on the Chicago Bears and doubled my money.
5. To expect or feel sure that something will happen: You can wager on Chris being late to the meeting.
See also: on, wager
References in periodicals archive ?
OKLAHOMA CITY Remington Park will debut a new wager on its racing program on Friday.
Others have taken the wager as an argument in support of theism, with the other arguments--appeals to satisfied prophecies and to miracles--as follow-up arguments in support of Christianity as the theistic religion to wager on.
Now, however, the Pascalian can employ arguments from satisfied prophecies, and miracles, and arguments that Christianity alone meets our existential needs, in support of the claim that Christianity is the theistic tradition one should wager on.
For example, you could wager on whether the total number of pay-per-view buys will surpass 4.99 million.
To offset favorite betting, the track will increase odds on less favored horses to give bettors an incentive to wager on longshots.