wade

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Related to waded: wadded, waded through

wading bird

A type of bird with long legs and a long neck that is typically found in shallow water. Examples include the crane and the stork. Look at all that wading bird near the shore. I think it might be a heron.
See also: bird, wade

wade in(to someone or something)

1. Literally, to enter and begin moving through water. Despite my nervousness, I closed my eyes and waded into the ocean.
2. To join something that is already in progress. Don't wade into their debate unless you want to talk about politics for the rest of the night.
3. To begin to do something with energy and determination. She rolled up her sleeves and waded right in to help us with our baking mishap.
4. To lash out at someone or something. I'm not surprised Maria waded into you with some nasty insults—that girl is mean.
See also: someone, wade

wade through (something)

1. To physically try to move through some area or substance that restricts forward progress. Wading through waist-high water is quite a workout!
2. By extension, to struggle to do or complete something (usually due to some factor that is slowing down progress). Look at all these files! I'll never be able to wade through them in one day.
See also: through, wade

wade across something

to walk across something covered by water. Let's wade across the stream at this point. If I wade across it, I will get wet.
See also: across, wade

wade in

 (to something)
1. to walk into an area covered by water. The horse waded right into the stream. It waded right in.
2. Fig. to get quickly and directly involved in something. (Fig. on {2}.) Don't just wade into things. Stop and think about what you are doing. Just wade in and get started.
See also: wade

wade through something

 
1. to walk with effort through a substance, such as water, mud, garbage, etc. The soldiers waded through the mud on the way to battle. They waded through the mess to get to where they were going.
2. Fig. to struggle through something with difficulty. (Fig. on {2}.) You mean I have to wade through all these applications? I have to wade through forty term papers in the next two days.
See also: through, wade

wade in

Also, wade into. Plunge into, begin or attack resolutely and energetically, as in She waded into that pile of correspondence. This idiom transfers entering water to beginning some action. [Mid-1800s]
See also: wade

wade in

v.
1. To walk into a substance, such as water, that hinders normal movement: Unable to reach the buoy from the shore, I waded in toward it.
2. To join or intervene in an ongoing conflict, debate, or controversy: The government waded in to settle the contract dispute.
See also: wade

wade into

v.
1. To walk into something, such as water, that impedes normal movement: The child waded into the ocean.
2. To join or intervene in some ongoing conflict, debate, or controversy: The government waded into the dispute and forced a resolution. The mayor waded into the debate to elaborate on a few points.
3. To become increasingly involved in some effort: The committee waded into the task.
4. To attack someone or something verbally or physically: The supervisor waded into me with a vehement attack.
See also: wade

wade through

v.
1. To walk through something, such as water, that hinders normal movement: We waded through the water.
2. To proceed through something with great difficulty or effort: I waded through a boring report.
See also: through, wade