wack

(redirected from wackest)
Also found in: Dictionary.

beat off

1. To send away; to force to retreat. Despite the connotation of "beat," this phrase is often used hyperbolically and does not have to reference violent action. Because their house is in such a great location, they have been beating off a lot of interested buyers. I somehow managed to beat off the intruder with a baseball bat. Your daughter is so pretty—it's only a matter of time until she's beating off the suitors!
2. vulgar slang To masturbate. Typically said of males. A: "Why is he all embarrassed today?" B: "Oh, his crush walked in on him beating off. How horrifying is that?"
See also: beat, off

beat someone or something off

to drive someone or something away by beating. They beat the enemy off. The army beat off the savage attack, saving the town. I was able to beat off the intruder.
See also: beat, off

*out of wack (and out of whack)

 
1. crazy, silly, or irrational. (*Typically: be ~.) Why do you always act as if you're out of whack? I'm not out of wack. I'm eccentric.
2. Fig. out of adjustment; to be out of order. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) I'm afraid that my watch is out of whack. The elevator is out of wack. We'll have to walk up.
See also: of, out, wack

whack something

up Sl. to chop something up. In about an hour, he had whacked the tree up into small logs. Have you whacked up the chicken for frying yet?

whacked (out)

Sl. intoxicated. Gee, is he ever whacked! Dave was so whacked out he couldn't stand up.

beat off

Repulse, drive away by blows, as in We tried to beat off the flying ants swarming about us. Originating in the mid-1600s in a military context, this term was being used for other activities by the mid-1700s.
See also: beat, off

out of whack

see under out of kilter.
See also: of, out, whack

whacked out

1. Tired out, exhausted, as in They were whacked out after that long flight. [Slang; mid-1900s]
2. Crazy, especially under the influence of drugs. For example, She looked whacked out when the police picked her up. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: out, whacked

out of whack

out of order; not working. North American & Australian
1998 Bookseller There's been a fair amount of jeering…at the Sunday Times for getting its figures so comprehensively out of whack, by a factor of about 100 if memory serves.
See also: of, out, whack

out of ˈwhack

(informal, especially American English)
1 not appropriate or correct, especially in relation to something else: The Olympics have made flights and accommodation here incredibly expensive. Prices are way out of whack with normal.If you ask me, his priorities are all out of whack. He should find a job first, then decide where to live.
2 (especially of a system or machine) not working as it should: Don’t bother trying to call me on my cellphone. It’s out of whack again.
See also: of, out, whack

beat off

v.
1. To drive someone or something away, especially by fighting or hitting: Two robbers attacked me on the subway, but I beat them off with my bag. After a long battle, the soldiers beat off the invaders.
2. To defeat someone or something in a competition: Our company intends to beat off our rivals for the contract. The visiting team was behind us for most of the game, but beat us off squarely in the end.
3. Vulgar Slang To masturbate. Used of males.
See also: beat, off

beat off

and ball off and jack off and jag off and jerk off and pull oneself off and toss off and wack off and wank off and whack off and whank off and whip off
1. in. to masturbate. (Usually objectionable.) They say if you beat off too much, you’ll get pimples.
2. in. to waste time; to waste one’s efforts; to do something inefficiently. The whole lot of them were jacking off rather than sticking to business. Stop whanking off and get on with your work!
See also: beat, off

wack off

verb
See also: off, wack

out of w(h)ack

mod. out of adjustment; inoperative. (see also out of kilter.) I think my left eye is out of wack a little. Maybe I need glasses.
See also: of, out, whack

out of wack

verb
See also: of, out, wack

whack

and wack
1. tv. to strike someone or something. Larry reached down and wacked the dog across the snout.
2. n. a blow or hit (at someone or something). She landed a nasty wack on his thigh.
3. n. a drink of liquor. Take a whack of this stuff.
4. Go to w(h)acked.

wack

verb
See whack

w(h)ack someone/something up

in. to damage someone or something. (see also whack something up.) Bob got mad at Greg and whacked him up.
See also: something, up, whack

wack someone/something up

verb
See also: something, up, wack

w(h)ack someone (out)

tv. to kill somebody. (Underworld.) Willie made another try at whacking Albert out last evening.
See also: out, whack

wack someone out

verb
See also: out, wack

wack someone

verb
See also: wack

w(h)ack something (out)

tv. to rob a place; to swindle a business establishment. (Underworld.) Did your guys wack the church collection box?
See also: out, something, whack

wack something out

verb
See also: out, something, wack

wack something

verb
See also: something, wack

w(h)acked

and w(h)ack
1. mod. wild; silly. Bill was wacked as always and embarrassed us all.
2. Go to w(h)acked (out).

whack

verb

wacked

verb
See also: wack

wack

verb

w(h)acked (out)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Dave was so whacked out he couldn’t stand up.
See also: out, whacked

whacked

verb

wacked out

verb
See also: out, wack

wacked

verb
See also: wack

out of whack

Informal
Improperly ordered or balanced; not functioning correctly.
See also: of, out, whack

whacked out

Slang
1. Exhausted.
2. Crazy.
3. Under the influence of a mind-altering drug.
See also: out, whacked
References in periodicals archive ?
He was grinding it again to get a good fide away when the wackest human ever appeared and stood in the line of fire with his celly and a condescending grin on his wack face.