vet

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vet

1. n. a veterinarian. (Standard English.) The vet didn’t charge much to look at the turtle.
2. tv. to give a medical examination to and treat a person (or an animal). The doctor vetted me quickly and charged an unbelievable sum for it.
3. n. a (war) veteran. The vets in the hospitals across the land appreciate your kindness.
References in periodicals archive ?
When he faced the vetting panel in 2015, Kazungu who was the then Malindi MP was the least prosperous declaring a net worth of Sh100 million.
Appearing before the vetting panel, Bett who is now headed to be the Indian ambassador said he was worth Sh125million.
There is a planned programme of retrospective vetting for all officers and staff who are not vetted at the 2012 standards due to start.
Vetting, which can take several months, looks at an individual's finances, employment history and family associations, as well as a detailed search for any convictions.
NSVS replaces a range of disparate systems and manual processes with an intuitive user interface that enables applicants and vetting caseworkers to securely access the system from different locations, using many different devices.
Vince Groome, CIO, Defence Business Services, Ministry of Defence commented: We are delighted to be working closely together with CGI to make the NSVS application a reliable and robust solution, able to manage the ever changing needs for security vetting.
He said: "When I joined the unit there was no formal structure to how South Wales Police approached the vetting process.
Mr Jenkins said electronic systems have been put in place since 2007 to monitor the procedures on a force vetting register.
He said: "When I joined the unit there was no formal structure to how we approached the vetting process.
There were officers in posts who didn't have the right level of vetting and it was recognised we needed a formal structure.
revealed over 40 such vetting failures among police officers, police staff and non-police personnel with access to police premises.
Smaller police forces in particular found it difficult to cope with the levels of vetting required, it found.
The Committee on Appointments chaired by Muturi completed the vetting of CS nominees.
Forces should move to fully comply with national vetting guidelines 'as a matter of urgency', it said, and no later than next April.
The committee agreed it would go on with the vetting slated for next week even without the input of the opposition.