vet

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vet

1. n. a veterinarian. (Standard English.) The vet didn’t charge much to look at the turtle.
2. tv. to give a medical examination to and treat a person (or an animal). The doctor vetted me quickly and charged an unbelievable sum for it.
3. n. a (war) veteran. The vets in the hospitals across the land appreciate your kindness.
References in periodicals archive ?
NSVS replaces a range of disparate systems and manual processes with an intuitive user interface that enables applicants and vetting caseworkers to securely access the system from different locations, using many different devices.
Vince Groome, CIO, Defence Business Services, Ministry of Defence commented: We are delighted to be working closely together with CGI to make the NSVS application a reliable and robust solution, able to manage the ever changing needs for security vetting.
Steve Smart, Vice-President, Space, Defence and National Security, CGI in the UK noted: Security vetting is a fundamental enabler that underpins the integrity of the UK government.
She said: "The officer concerned always had the appropriate vetting, but the appropriate record was not locally updated as the individual was temporarily working in another force.
Cleveland Police has a vetting policy in place which applies to all individuals employed by Cleveland Police or the police and crime commissioner as a police officer or police staff, members of the Special Constabulary, contractors, volunteers and others who work in partnership with the force and have access to police premises, information, intelligence or assets.
The vetting policy is in place to support the force in maintaining high levels of honesty and integrity and preventing dishonest, corrupt, unprofessional and unethical behaviour.
He said: "When I joined the unit there was no formal structure to how South Wales Police approached the vetting process.
Mr Jenkins said electronic systems have been put in place since 2007 to monitor the procedures on a force vetting register.
He said: "When I joined the unit there was no formal structure to how we approached the vetting process.
There were officers in posts who didn't have the right level of vetting and it was recognised we needed a formal structure.
The inspection identified quite a number of disturbing examples where vetting processes have failed.
revealed over 40 such vetting failures among police officers, police staff and non-police personnel with access to police premises.
Forces should move to fully comply with national vetting guidelines 'as a matter of urgency', it said, and no later than next April.