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keep (one's) cards close to (one's) vest

To keep one's plans, intentions, or tactics secret from everyone else. Refers to holding one's playing cards close to one's chest in a card game, so as not to allow other players to see one's hand. We're all curious about what the boss has been discussing in those meetings with the lawyers, but she's keeping her cards close to her vest. Sorry for not being more straightforward about my plans, but I'm keeping my cards close to my vest for the time being.
See also: card, close, keep, vest

play (one's) cards close to (one's) vest

To keep one's plans, intentions, or tactics secret from everyone else. Refers to holding one's playing cards close to one's vest in a card game, so as not to allow other players to see one's hand. We're all curious about what the boss has been discussing in those meetings with the lawyers, but she's playing her cards close to her vest. Sorry for not being more straightforward about my plans, but I'm playing my cards close to my vest for the time being.
See also: card, close, play, vest

vest (something) in (someone or something)

To grant, place, or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., under the authority of some specific person or group. Often used in passive constructions. Don't you think you've vested a bit too much autonomy in your supervisors? By the powers vested in me by the state of Wyoming, I grant you husband and wife! I'm vesting control over my fortune in my granddaughter, Sophia.
See also: vest

vest (one) with (something)

To grant or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., to some specific person or group. Don't you think you've vested the supervisors of each department with a bit too much autonomy? The state has vested me with the power to unite two people in matrimony, a privilege that I do not take lightly. I'm vesting my granddaughter, Sophia, control over my entire fortune.
See also: vest

play one's cards close to one's chest

 and play one's cards close to one's vest; keep one's cards close to one's chest; keep one's cards close to one's vest
Fig. to keep to oneself or be very cautious in one's dealing with people. (As if one were playing cards and not permitting anyone to see any of the cards.) He is very cautious. He plays his cards close to his chest. You seem to be playing your cards close to your vest.
See also: card, chest, close, play

vest someone with something

to grant power, rights, or ownership to someone. Who vested you with the power to order me around? The dictator vested himself with the power to imprison almost anyone.
See also: vest

vest something in someone or something

to grant sole power or control over something to someone or some group. The king vested all the military power in his own hands. The constitution vests the power to tax in the legislature.
See also: vest

play your cards close to your chest

mainly BRITISH or

play your cards close to the vest

AMERICAN
If you play your cards close to your chest, you do not tell anyone about your plans or thoughts. Williams is playing his cards close to his chest, especially in terms of his driver line-up for next season. He plays his cards very close to the vest, leaving some attorneys with whom he's worked to describe him as secretive and manipulative. Note: You can also say that someone keeps their cards close to their chest or keeps their cards close to the vest. The Prime Minister was said yesterday to be keeping his cards close to his chest after an informal discussion at cabinet on Thursday. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of cards. Taylor kept his thoughts close to his chest, saying only: `I'm not prepared to comment.' I have no inside information — Dave's playing this one close to his chest. The military's playing this whole operation pretty close to the vest — they generally don't like to talk about future operations. Note: This is a reference to card-players holding their cards close to their chest so that nobody else can see them.
See also: card, chest, close, play

vest in

v.
To place something, such as authority, property, or rights, in the control of someone or some group: I vested my estate in my son. The judge is very conscientious about the duties and responsibilities that are vested in her.
See also: vest

vest with

v.
To invest or endow someone or some group with something, such as power or rights: The company vests its employees with full pension rights after five years of service. The council is vested with broad powers.
See also: vest

vest

1. n. an important businessman or businesswoman. (see also suit.) Some vest jumped out the window this afternoon.
2. n. a bullet-proof vest. The cop wasn’t wearing a vest, and the shot killed him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gunners vest was sponsored by the James Brockmeyer Memorial Fund and embroidered with the sentiment "In loving memory of Officer James I.
Dan Patrick, who made the legislation a priority, said in January that the state would look for ways to continue funding the vests as they expire.
2 The flame resistant vests are a monocrylic material that is chemically treated when the material is produced.
The "Occasions" campaign for Groupon Grassroots to outfit police K9s with bullet and stab protective vests ran Feb.
I am extremely proud of the generosity of our medical staff and patients for providing this life-saving vest to Nikita to keep him safe.
A spokesman for Huddersfield University said their own campus security staff did not wear stab vests, adding: "There is no reason to and we've never had reason for staff to wear stab vests.
Dinesh Gatar, the sweeper, made this statement before a magistrate a year after the vest worn by the slain anti- terrorism squad ( ATS) chief was reported missing.
The difference between Instavest and some other quick release vests would be the use of this system not only in emergency situation but in normal situations because of the ease of reassembling and putting it back on.
If you thought vests were just for dads and came only in white cotton, think again.
By comparison, the "flak vest" of Vietnam came in at about 25 pounds, and the original flak vest worn by airmen during World War II weighed around 40 pounds, Air Force Museum officials said.
The report shows that a subsequent mini-study was ordered to verify if the trend against vests was widespread.
Based on Parker's recommendation the group purchased several vests and is currently field-testing them at Exercise Cobra Gold 2005 in Thailand.
27) Under these rules, the USCR participant (absent treaty protection, discussed below) is taxed as vested transfers or contributions are made or as the participant's interest vests.
MANY OF THOSE IN LAW ENFORCEMENT HAVE COME TO VALUE SUCH VESTS BECAUSE THEY ALLOW CONCEALMENT OF A DUTY WEAPON WHILE AVOIDING THE NECESSITY OF WEARING A SUIT COAT.