vested


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have a vested interest (in something)

To have a personal stake in something, typically because one could potentially benefit from it. Of course I have a vested interest in how the board reacts to this proposal—if they like it, they might promote me!
See also: have, interest, vested

vest (something) in (someone or something)

To grant, place, or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., under the authority of some specific person or group. Often used in passive constructions. Don't you think you've vested a bit too much autonomy in your supervisors? By the powers vested in me by the state of Wyoming, I grant you husband and wife! I'm vesting control over my fortune in my granddaughter, Sophia.
See also: vest

vest (one) with (something)

To grant or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., to some specific person or group. Don't you think you've vested the supervisors of each department with a bit too much autonomy? The state has vested me with the power to unite two people in matrimony, a privilege that I do not take lightly. I'm vesting my granddaughter, Sophia, control over my entire fortune.
See also: vest

vested interest

A strong, self-motivated interest or stake (in someone or something). The industry accounts for nearly 30% of our annual revenue, so of course we have a vested interest in any legislation that could affect it. He's got a $200 bet riding on this team, so yes, you could say he's got a vested interest in whether they win or lose.
See also: interest, vested

*vested interest (in something)

Fig. a personal or biased interest, often financial, in something. (*Typically: have ~; give someone ~.) Margaret has a vested interest in wanting her father to sell the family firm. She has shares in it and would make a large profit. Bob has a vested interest in keeping the village traffic-free. He has a summer home there.
See also: interest, vested

vested interest

A personal stake in something, as in She has a vested interest in keeping the house in her name. This term, first recorded in 1818, uses vested in the sense of "established" or "secured."
See also: interest, vested

have a vested ˈinterest (in something)

have a personal reason for wanting something to happen, especially because you get some advantage from it: He has a vested interest in Mona leaving the firm (= perhaps because he may get her job).
See also: have, interest, vested

vested interest

A personal stake in an existing arrangement or institution; also, in the plural (vested interests), those who have such a stake. In his oft-quoted essay On Liberty (1859), John Stuart Mill wrote, “The doctrine ascribes to all mankind a vested interest in each other’s moral, intellectual, and even physical perfection.”
See also: interest, vested
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, in the case of an employees' trust, section 402(b)(4) will annually tax "highly compensated" participants on the increase in value of their vested interests, if the plan's coverage is not sufficiently non-discriminatory.
Before passage of ERISA 14 years ago, there were no statutory requirements for vesting,3An employer who provided a pension plan determined if when, and under what conditions employees obtained vested rights to the accrued benefits.
Although an employer may elect to use the modified special-timing rule and wait until the resolution date to report deferred amounts as FICA wages, it may also choose to include the deferred vested amounts as FICA wages at any time before the resolution date.
Inland Empire Electrical Workers Pension Plan &,Trust, 3 F3d 1246 (1993), the Ninth Circuit stated that plan participants who left their employment before their interests had become vested were protected against forfeiture of benefits on plan termination only if they were "affected" by the plan's termination.
The benefits of electing to be taxed in the year of receipt are twofold: (1) the recipient avoids recognizing subsequent appreciation in the partnership interest as compensation income when the interest becomes vested and (2) any amounts received as partnership distributions are not recharacterized as compensation--the service partner is treated as a partner for purposes of allocating partnership income and loss.
A Federal district court granted Morrell the requested declaratory relief, finding that the health benefits provided under any master agreement were limited to its three-year term and, therefore, were not vested under either the contract or ERISA.
Generally, plan loans secured by a participant's account balance in a defined contribution plan are limited to 50% of the participant's total vested account balance (disregarding the $50,000 ceiling and the $10,000 floor restriction under Sec.
On July 1, 1991, Gary's partnership interest became fully vested.