vest


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keep (one's) cards close to (one's) vest

To keep one's plans, intentions, or tactics secret from everyone else. Refers to holding one's playing cards close to one's chest in a card game, so as not to allow other players to see one's hand. We're all curious about what the boss has been discussing in those meetings with the lawyers, but she's keeping her cards close to her vest. Sorry for not being more straightforward about my plans, but I'm keeping my cards close to my vest for the time being.
See also: card, close, keep, vest

play (one's) cards close to (one's) vest

To keep one's plans, intentions, or tactics secret from everyone else. Refers to holding one's playing cards close to one's vest in a card game, so as not to allow other players to see one's hand. We're all curious about what the boss has been discussing in those meetings with the lawyers, but she's playing her cards close to her vest. Sorry for not being more straightforward about my plans, but I'm playing my cards close to my vest for the time being.
See also: card, close, play, vest

vest (something) in (someone or something)

To grant, place, or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., under the authority of some specific person or group. Often used in passive constructions. Don't you think you've vested a bit too much autonomy in your supervisors? By the powers vested in me by the state of Wyoming, I grant you husband and wife! I'm vesting control over my fortune in my granddaughter, Sophia.
See also: vest

vest (one) with (something)

To grant or endow something, such as power, rights, control, etc., to some specific person or group. Don't you think you've vested the supervisors of each department with a bit too much autonomy? The state has vested me with the power to unite two people in matrimony, a privilege that I do not take lightly. I'm vesting my granddaughter, Sophia, control over my entire fortune.
See also: vest

play one's cards close to one's chest

 and play one's cards close to one's vest; keep one's cards close to one's chest; keep one's cards close to one's vest
Fig. to keep to oneself or be very cautious in one's dealing with people. (As if one were playing cards and not permitting anyone to see any of the cards.) He is very cautious. He plays his cards close to his chest. You seem to be playing your cards close to your vest.
See also: card, chest, close, play

vest someone with something

to grant power, rights, or ownership to someone. Who vested you with the power to order me around? The dictator vested himself with the power to imprison almost anyone.
See also: vest

vest something in someone or something

to grant sole power or control over something to someone or some group. The king vested all the military power in his own hands. The constitution vests the power to tax in the legislature.
See also: vest

play your cards close to your chest

mainly BRITISH or

play your cards close to the vest

AMERICAN
If you play your cards close to your chest, you do not tell anyone about your plans or thoughts. Williams is playing his cards close to his chest, especially in terms of his driver line-up for next season. He plays his cards very close to the vest, leaving some attorneys with whom he's worked to describe him as secretive and manipulative. Note: You can also say that someone keeps their cards close to their chest or keeps their cards close to the vest. The Prime Minister was said yesterday to be keeping his cards close to his chest after an informal discussion at cabinet on Thursday. Note: Other nouns are sometimes used instead of cards. Taylor kept his thoughts close to his chest, saying only: `I'm not prepared to comment.' I have no inside information — Dave's playing this one close to his chest. The military's playing this whole operation pretty close to the vest — they generally don't like to talk about future operations. Note: This is a reference to card-players holding their cards close to their chest so that nobody else can see them.
See also: card, chest, close, play

vest in

v.
To place something, such as authority, property, or rights, in the control of someone or some group: I vested my estate in my son. The judge is very conscientious about the duties and responsibilities that are vested in her.
See also: vest

vest with

v.
To invest or endow someone or some group with something, such as power or rights: The company vests its employees with full pension rights after five years of service. The council is vested with broad powers.
See also: vest

vest

1. n. an important businessman or businesswoman. (see also suit.) Some vest jumped out the window this afternoon.
2. n. a bullet-proof vest. The cop wasn’t wearing a vest, and the shot killed him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstrators from both the left and the right wings of British politics have adopted the 'Gilets Jaunes' or Yellow Vest form of protest that first became prominent in France throughout November and December
When asked in the interview if Vest's goal is to democratize the use of options by advisors for end clients, Sood responded by saying it's "trying to make the benefits of options more accessible -- options are the ingredients to deliver certain investment outcomes."
"The vest is so vital for Adam and pounds 7,000 is a lot of money so we have made some donations and hopefully with this walk as well, we can raise enough money."
In chapter 4, Vest's purpose is to recuperate Now Wait for Last Year from the scrapheap of critical disdain and to demonstrate the ways in which the novel fits Vest's overall thesis.
The fact that the victim was none other than Karkare, a joint commissioner of police, and yet the police managed to " lose" his vest is an appaling laxity.
Students at Philadelphia University have been the project's guinea pigs, wearing pressure sensors and vests as they run, jump and crawl.
"I have a lot of doormen using this vest and I have never had one of them come back to me looking for a refund.
Neon pink flamenco vest, pounds 24.99 from River Island Taryn sequin vest, pounds 99 from Hobbs Plain coloured vests, pounds 3 from George at Asda Savoir indigo embroidered jersey vest pounds 20 from Littlewoods Striped anchor vest, pounds 8 from Matalan Et Vous irridescent sequin vest, pounds 20 from Matalan Fornania Striped vest, pounds 49, white shorts, pounds 18, bangles, pounds 30, Faith platforms, pounds 80, all from Freemans
During a now-infamous scene with Claudette Colbert, Clark Gable removed his dress shirt to reveal, not a white vest, but a bare chest.
But I trust that if Boris heads out into the forests to lead the charge, he'll be wearing a vest. Not only is such a garment functional, it is also now very fashionable.
"The NFL says there are no plans to add additional logos to the vests, or to increase the size of the marks, and that they think the Reebok and Canon logos are appropriate because the vests are made by Reebok and because Canon 'has made the commitment to fund the cost of the vest,'" NPPA reported on its Web site after receiving the letter from NFL vice president of public relations Greg Aiello, which added that "Both logos are directly related to the manufacture of the vest.
THE new Improved Outer Tactical Vest, three pounds lighter and more protective than the current version, will soon be issued to Soldiers deploying to Iraq and Afghanistan, said Brig.
White skirt, EUR29, Republic, Aqua vest, EUR5, Zara.
To ensure Bob's memory lives on, the folks at Mossy Oak Apparel are proud to announce the new Dixon Limited Edition Turkey Vest. Each limited edition vest will be numbered 1 through 1986 (commemorating the year 1986, when Mossy Oak was founded).