vessel


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

broken vessel

Someone who is or feels completely destroyed, hollow, forsaken, or inadequate. Taken from the biblical symbolism of a person being a vessel into which God fills divine wisdom and grace. I have no one who cares about me, and I have no job or prospects. I'm feeling like a broken vessel these days.
See also: broken, vessel

weaker vessel

A woman. The phrase originated in the Bible. I don't care if you think I'm just a weaker vessel—I've trained to fight on the front lines.
See also: vessel

burst a blood vessel

1. To put forth great effort towards some goal or end. Annabelle practically burst a blood vessel cleaning the whole house and setting up all the guest rooms for you guys, and you don't even appreciate it!
2. To become angry and begin yelling. The boss burst a blood vessel when he heard that the printer still hadn't finished our order.
See also: blood, burst, vessel

empty vessels make (the) most noise

Foolish, unwise, or stupid people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most noise.
See also: empty, make, most, noise, vessel

empty vessels make the most sound

Foolish, unwise, or stupid people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

empty vessels make (the) most sound

Foolish, unwise, or stupid people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

Empty vessels make the most sound.

Prov. Foolish people make the most noise. I suspect Amy is not very smart. She chatters constantly, and as they say, empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

empty vessels make the most sound

or

empty vessels make the most noise

OLD-FASHIONED
People say empty vessels make the most sound or empty vessels make the most noise to mean that people who talk a lot and give their opinions a lot are often not very intelligent or talented. There's a lot of truth in that old saying, `Empty vessels make the most sound'. Those who are actually content with their choices are not usually interested in telling the rest of us about them. Note: People like this can be called empty vessels. These `experts' who talk a lot but actually say nothing have been shown up for the empty vessels they are. Note: A vessel is a container such as a jug, pot or jar.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

empty vessels make most noise (or sound)

those with least wisdom or knowledge are always the most talkative. proverb
Vessel here refers to a hollow container, such as a bowl or cask, rather than a ship.
See also: empty, make, most, noise, vessel

ˌburst a ˈblood vessel

(informal) get very angry and excited: When I told Dad I’d damaged the car, he nearly burst a blood vessel.
See also: blood, burst, vessel
References in classic literature ?
He arrived there in 1687, and was received with great joy by the Duke of Albemarle and other English lords who had fitted out the vessel.
Tired of tending sheep, he next apprenticed himself to a ship-carpenter, and spent about four years in hewing the crooked limbs of oak-trees into knees for vessels.
There was a much better prospect, they thought, of growing rich by plundering vessels which still sailed in the sea than by seeking for a ship that had lain beneath the waves full half a century.
Our vessel was hove up in the wind, and the boat was lowered.
He was a sick and destitute foreign seaman, and he had hidden himself in the hold of an English vessel (bound to a port in his native country) which had sailed from Liverpool that morning.
Not the slightest movement in the vessel had been perceptible in the cabin; not a sound had been audible indicating the rising of the breeze.
But when he observed in one corner of the vessel the little trunk in which she used to keep her jewels, which he well knew he had left in Algiers and had not brought to the garden, he was still more amazed, and asked her how that trunk had come into our hands, and what there was in it.
But, as good seldom or never comes pure and unmixed, without being attended or followed by some disturbing evil that gives a shock to it, our fortune, or perhaps the curses which the Moor had hurled at his daughter (for whatever kind of father they may come from these are always to be dreaded), brought it about that when we were now in mid-sea, and the night about three hours spent, as we were running with all sail set and oars lashed, for the favouring breeze saved us the trouble of using them, we saw by the light of the moon, which shone brilliantly, a square-rigged vessel in full sail close to us, luffing up and standing across our course, and so close that we had to strike sail to avoid running foul of her, while they too put the helm hard up to let us pass.
But as the moon did not show that night, and the sky was clouded, and as we knew not whereabouts we were, it did not seem to us a prudent thing to make for the shore, as several of us advised, saying we ought to run ourselves ashore even if it were on rocks and far from any habitation, for in this way we should be relieved from the apprehensions we naturally felt of the prowling vessels of the Tetuan corsairs, who leave Barbary at nightfall and are on the Spanish coast by daybreak, where they commonly take some prize, and then go home to sleep in their own houses.
Morrel," said Dantes, approaching, "the vessel now rides at anchor, and I am at your service.
Asked me questions about the vessel, the time she left Marseilles, the course she had taken, and what was her cargo.
The two oarsmen bent to their work, and the little boat glided away as rapidly as possible in the midst of the thousand vessels which choke up the narrow way which leads between the two rows of ships from the mouth of the harbor to the Quai d'Orleans.
The traffic with white men had put them in possession of vessels of superior description; they had made themselves acquainted with their management, and had even made rude advances in the art of ship-building.
Here the vessels engaged in the fur trade touched to make repairs and procure provisions; and here they often sheltered themselves during the winters that occurred in their long coasting expeditions.
It would be difficult," he writes, "to imagine the frantic gambols that are daily played off here; sometimes dressing in red coats, and otherwise very fantastically, and collecting a number of ignorant natives around them, telling them that they are the great eris of the Northwest, and making arrangements for sending three or four vessels yearly to them from the coast with spars,