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cite (something) chapter and verse

To recite all the facts or details of something. Likened to quoting scripture by citing the exact chapter and verse where it appears. Ask Stan if you need to be updated on the case—he can cite it chapter and verse.
See also: and, chapter, cite, verse

chapter and verse

In thorough and exact detail. Likened to the ability to quote a passage of scripture by citing the exact chapter and verse where it appears. If you need to be updated on the case, ask Stan—he can cite it chapter and verse. I know the manual chapter and verse. Which part are you looking for?
See also: and, chapter, verse

give chapter and verse

To provide full, specific, and authoritative information to support some quote, question, or issue at hand. Can also be used with similar verbs such as "offer," "cite," quote," etc. It is a reference to quoting scripture. Don't try to debate Sarah about physics. She'll give chapter and verse until you realize she's right. You can't be so vague if you want to convince me. You'll have to give chapter and verse.
See also: and, chapter, give, verse

chapter and verse

Fig. very specifically detailed, in reference to sources of information. (A reference to the method of referring to biblical text.) He gave chapter and verse for his reasons for disputing that Shakespeare had written the play. The suspect gave chapter and verse of his associate's activities.
See also: and, chapter, verse

chapter and verse

The precise authority backing up a statement or view; established rules for or detailed information about something. For example, You can't withdraw a card after you've played it; I'll cite you the rules, chapter and verse . The term alludes to the chapter and verse of a quotation from the Bible, long regarded as an ultimate authority. [Early 1600s]
See also: and, chapter, verse

chapter and verse

If you give someone chapter and verse on a subject, you tell them all the details of it, without missing anything out. It gives chapter and verse on how to select a product. When we expressed doubts they handed us the proof, chapter and verse. Note: This expression refers to the practice of giving precise chapter and verse numbers when quoting passages from the Bible.
See also: and, chapter, verse

chapter and verse

an exact reference or authority.
Chapter and verse was originally used to refer to the numbering of passages in the Bible. It is now also used more generally to refer to any (usually written) authority for something.
See also: and, chapter, verse

ˌchapter and ˈverse

the exact details of something, especially the exact place where particular information may be found: I can’t give you chapter and verse, but I can tell you that the lines she quoted come from a Brecht play.This originally referred to books of the Bible, which are divided into chapters with numbered divisions called verses.
See also: and, chapter, verse

verse in

v.
To familiarize someone with something by study or experience. Used chiefly in the passive or with a reflexive: She is versed in physics. He has versed himself in the art of fencing. The music teacher will verse the students in keeping time to a beat.
See also: verse

chapter and verse

mod. in the finest detail. (From the chapter and verse organization of the Bible.) He could recite the law concerning state-funded libraries, chapter and verse.
See also: and, chapter, verse
References in classic literature ?
These three books," said the curate, "are the best that have been written in Castilian in heroic verse, and they may compare with the most famous of Italy; let them be preserved as the richest treasures of poetry that Spain possesses.
These verses from "Annabel Lee," written by Poe in 1849, the last year of his life, tell of his sorrow at the loss of his child-wife:
Lowell suggested this additional verse, from the "Haunted Palace":
thank you, La Fontaine; you have just given me the two concluding verses of my paper.
La Fontaine placed himself at a table, and set his rapid pen an endless dance across the smooth white vellum; Pelisson made a fair copy of his prologue; Moliere contributed fifty fresh verses, with which his visit to Percerin had inspired him; Loret, an article on the marvelous
Sonya, shaking off some down which clung to her and tucking away the verses in the bosom of her dress close to her bony little chest, ran after Natasha down the passage into the sitting room with flushed face and light, joyous steps.
He had not finished the last verse before the young people began to get ready to dance in the large hall, and the sound of the feet and the coughing of the musicians were heard from the gallery.
For he found that not only could he sing these verses, but he who had before been dumb and ashamed when the harp was put into his hand, could now make and sing more beautifully than could others.
Then she commanded Caedmon, "in the presence of many learned men, to tell his dream and repeat the verses that they might all give their judgment what it was and whence his verse came.
This verse he has taken over from Hesiod's "Catalogue of Women".
Fragment #100 -- Argument to the Shield of Heracles, i: The beginning of the "Shield" as far as the 56th verse is current in the fourth "Catalogue".
After the dozen verses of "Root Hog or Die," Mark Hall claimed to be especially infatuated with:
The abalone meat they pounded religiously to a verse of doggerel improvised by Saxon.
Meter, the distinguishing formal mark of poetry and all verse, is merely rhythm which is regular in certain fundamental respects, roughly speaking is rhythm in which the recurrence of stressed syllables or of feet with definite time-values is regular.
In the last paragraph of the Prologue, verse 7, Zarathustra gives us a foretaste of his teaching concerning the big and the little sagacities, expounded subsequently.