venture

(redirected from venturing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to venturing: corporate venturing

nothing ventured, nothing gained

Risks must be taken in order to achieve anything significant or meaningful. A: "I'm thinking of asking my bosses for a raise, but I'm a little bit nervous." B: "Hey, nothing ventured, nothing gained." It was a bit of a shot in the dark taking a job in a different country, but nothing ventured, nothing gained!
See also: gain, nothing

at a venture

At random; in an arbitrary manner. They'll choose a winner at a venture, so we all have the same chance of getting picked.
See also: venture

venture forth

1. To move forward, especially in a courageous but cautious or wary manner. The explorers ventured forth, hoping to find the remains of the ancient civilization in the dense jungle. Before we venture forth, I suggest we all check that we have adequate supplies.
2. To proceed with some action or undertaking despite potential obstacles or dangers. Now that you have completed your degrees, you are all ready to venture forth into the world and truly begin the rest of your lives!
See also: forth, venture

venture into (some place)

To move forward into some place, especially in a courageous but cautious or wary manner. The explorers ventured into the dense jungle, hoping to find the remains of the ancient civilization they had read about. No way am I venturing into some pitch-black cave—who knows what might be lurking in there!
See also: venture

venture on (someone or something)

To discover or encounter someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. We ventured on a charming little restaurant as we cycled through the countryside. The two boys ventured on a man claiming to have magical beans for sale.
See also: on, venture

venture upon (someone or something)

To discover or encounter someone or something unexpectedly or by chance. We ventured upon a charming little restaurant as we cycled through the countryside. The two boys ventured upon a man claiming to have magical beans for sale.
See also: upon, venture

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

If you do not take risks, you will never accomplish anything. Bill: Should I ask my boss for a promotion? Jane: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I think I'll audition for a part in that play. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

venture forth

 
1. Fig. to set out; to go forward; to go out cautiously. George ventured forth into the night. I think I will venture forth. It looks safe.
2. Fig. to go forth bravely. Let us venture forth and conquer the enemy. We will arm ourselves and venture forth against our foe.
See also: forth, venture

venture out (something)

 and venture out of (something)
to go out of something cautiously. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Peter ventured out of his house for only a minute into the cold. He ventured out the door for only a moment.
See also: out, venture

venture (up)on someone or something

to come upon someone or something by chance. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on. The entire expression is formal or stilted.) David ventured upon Fred, who was out looking for mushrooms. I ventured on a little shop on Maple Street that deals in old model trains.
See also: on, venture

nothing ventured, nothing gained

One must take risks to achieve something, as in They quit their jobs, packed up, and moved to Wisconsin, saying "nothing ventured, nothing gained." Although this adage has appeared in slightly different form since the late 1300s, it was first recorded in this form only in 1624. For another version, see no pain, no gain.
See also: gain, nothing

nothing ˌventured, nothing ˈgained

(saying) used to say that you have to take risks if you want to achieve things and be successful: Go on, apply for the job. You know what they say — nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

venture forth

v.
To proceed despite possible danger or risk: After the storm subsided, we ventured forth to assess the damage.
See also: forth, venture

venture into

v.
To proceed into something despite possible danger or risk: The explorers ventured into the dark cave.
See also: venture

venture on

or venture upon
v.
To come upon something by chance or fortune: The travelers ventured on a charming country inn. The explorers ventured upon a hidden cache of gold.
See also: on, venture

at a venture

By mere chance or fortune; at random.
See also: venture

nothing ventured, nothing gained

If you won’t take a chance you can’t expect to achieve anything. There are two older proverbial forms of this expression, nothing (nought) venture, nothing (nought) have, stated by Chaucer (ca. 1374), and nothing venture, nothing win, stated by William Caxton about a century later. The modern form appears in Thomas Heywood’s play Captives (1624): “I see here that nought venters, nothinge gaynes.” It has been repeated in numerous languages ever since. Another, seemingly modern form is no pain, no gain, today frequently uttered by coaches, trainers, and physical therapists. Versions of this date from the early seventeenth century—“Pain is forgotten where gain follows” appeared in several early proverb collections—and the current rhyming cliché was proverbial by the mid-nineteenth century.
See also: gain, nothing
References in periodicals archive ?
The firm size-related bias in the response rate may be attributable to the possibility that smaller firms are less likely to be involved in internal corporate venturing, and therefore did not respond to "irrelevant" research requests.
This survey was completed by the corporate-level manager who served as the individual principally responsible for overseeing the overall venturing activity of the firm.
For example, some ICVs are founded for the purpose of leveraging a corporation's preexisting assets in new business arenas, whereas other ICVs are founded as market probes where success is best measured in terms of the knowledge generated through the venturing effort (Covin & Miles, 2007; Keil, McGrath, & Tukiainen, 2009).
We use the concepts of knowledge stocks and flows to explain the differential effects of operations independence on ICV performance, thus also making a conceptual contribution to the literature in our extension of the knowledge-based view to internal corporate venturing. Our results indicate that venture operations independence does not have a direct, linear relationship with ICV performance, but that market familiarity, opportunity identification mode, and planning autonomy all interact with venture operations independence to predict ICV performance.
This suggests that, although operations independence between an ICV and its parent may present an impediment to knowledge flows, the adverse effect of this impediment may be lessened when venturing into familiar markets.
Likewise, the ambiance for successful venturing is created by the five factors highlighted in Figure 2.
For corporate venturing to be successful, it is imperative that a visionary senior executive--CEO, CTO, CSO, VP, or a board member--be in charge (15).
Develop distinct evaluation criteria for the VU.--There is a fundamental conflict between the venturing and the established firm's management requirements.
The evaluation of a VU is generally based on a combination of its strategic and financial value; the venturing objectives determine the relative importance of these aspects.
All the firms in the case study--Shell, Nokia and IBM-have defined their venturing process, from the gestation of ideas through commercialization, with clearly identifiable milestones and evaluation criteria.
The present study builds on prior corporate venturing theory and research in creating a classification typology that frames the diverse scope of potential venturing activities.
This article is part of a long-term project aimed at delineating the generic benefits and risks of various forms of corporate venturing. The first phase of this project entailed an extensive review of the literature pertaining to corporate venturing and resulted in the development of the previously discussed typology of corporate venturing forms.
Each interview was begun using a structured protocol of general questions pertaining to corporate venturing activities.
It is important to note that the corporations studied were not pre-selected to conform to any a priori distribution within the typology's cells, but were included based on their interest in and experience with corporate venturing. Moreover, typed summaries of the interviews and a draft of this article were made available to the interviewees to ensure accuracy in how the firm's venturing activities were described and classified.
Corporations often concurrently engage in multiple forms of venturing. Nonetheless, the four forms of corporate venturing are discussed separately below in order to elucidate their fundamental differences.