veil

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take the veil

To become a nun (and thus wear a nun's headdress). Yes, I am taking the veil and devoting my life to God.
See also: take, veil

draw a veil over (something)

To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please draw a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear about it as possible. I tried to draw a veil over my inexperience so that the recruiter would seriously consider me for the job.
See also: draw, over, veil

lift the veil (on something)

To divulge, explain, or reveal something that was previously a secret. Our hope is that this expedition will lift the veil on the secrets of the ancient king's tomb. The celebrity's interview purports to lift the veil on her extremely private married life.
See also: lift, veil

beyond the veil

In the spiritual world or the mystical state after death. As frightened as I am to die, I'm also curious to know what it's like beyond the veil.
See also: beyond, veil

cast a veil over (something)

To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please cast a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear about it as possible. I tried to cast a veil over my inexperience so that the recruiter would seriously consider me for the job.
See also: cast, over, veil

throw a veil over (something)

To conceal something, usually by not talking about it. Can we please throw a veil over that stupid rumor about me? It's not true, but I want as few people to hear about it as possible. I tried to throw a veil over my inexperience so that the recruiter would seriously consider me for the job.
See also: over, throw, veil

draw a veil over

Conceal or avoid discussing something; keep from public knowledge. For example, Louise drew a veil over the accounting errors. [c. 1700]
See also: draw, over, veil

draw a veil over something

If you draw a veil over something, you deliberately do not talk about it because you want to keep it private or because it is embarrassing. It would be kinder, perhaps, to draw a veil over the party's career from 1906 to the outbreak of the War. Most of us have something in our past career over which we choose to draw a veil. Note: A veil is a piece of cloth used by a woman to cover her face.
See also: draw, over, something, veil

beyond the veil

in a mysterious or hidden place or state, especially the unknown state of existence after death.
The phrase was originally a figurative reference to the veil which concealed the innermost sanctuary of the Temple in Jerusalem; it was later taken as referring to the mysterious division between the next world and this.
See also: beyond, veil

draw a veil over

avoid discussing or calling attention to something, especially because it is embarrassing or unpleasant.
See also: draw, over, veil

take the veil

become a nun.
See also: take, veil

cast/draw/throw a ˈveil over something

(written) say nothing or no more about something unpleasant: It is kinder to draw a veil over some of his later movies.
See also: cast, draw, over, something, throw, veil

draw a veil over, to

To conceal; to say no more about something. A cliché from the mid-nineteenth century, this analogy to hiding one’s face behind a veil is often used to gloss over the details of an embarrassing situation. Daniel Defoe, long known as a historian before he turned his hand to fiction, wrote in The True-born Englishman (1701), “Satyr, be kind! and draw a silent Veil! Thy native England’s vices to conceal.”
See also: draw, veil
References in periodicals archive ?
Irrespective of the reasons for which they had veiled, all women admitted that wearing the hijab "is not a trivial thing, it is a very serious matter.
Another activist begged to disagree and argued that veiled presenters were exaggerating the manner of the injustice to which they are subjected.
C[pounds sterling]ICOd seen her walking about, but she was always veiled.C[yen]
Shirazi lists the kinds of images of veiled Middle Eastern women she says are presented by the American advertising industry--"the concubine in the harem at the mercy of her tyrannical master; the exotic but inaccessible veiled women; and the suppressed women who is treated like chattel"--although these descriptions seem far too dichotomized to me.
[40] He most certainly read Boccaccio, whose Genealogy of the Pagan Gods refers explicitly to Jerome's beautiful captive in conjunction with two additional gendered tropes for reading: the figure by which allegory is represented as a veiled woman and the metaphor by which Ulysses before the Sirens becomes an exemplary interpreter.
This study then examines how these discursive disputes affect gender identity negotiation among veiled and unveiled Muslim women living in Austin, Texas.
Veiled Threats proceeds directly from his 1992 book, Madonnas that Maim.
This is all the more striking as the "Veiled Woman" is probably the central (and undifferentiated) image that stereotypically represents these movements to outsiders, certainly to outsiders in the West.
However, in Egypt, a Middle Eastern country, where the majority of citizens are Muslim and the majority of women are veiled, several luxurious resorts have implemented their own ban and prevent women from entering pools wearing burkinis.
1) I will not allow a veiled nurse to give me injection.
I personally do not like to see fully veiled women, but then again I don't like to see middle aged British men with ugly beer guts in shorts and no tops!' Swansea-born Dr Rowan Williams, the current Archbishop of Canterbury, entered the veil debate last month by saying people should be free to wear visible religious symbols.
A CROWD of angry protesters, including around 30 veiled Muslim women, jeered embattled Labour MP Jack Straw yesterday.
Some years ago I was on the concourse of a large rail station wondering where I should go for trains to a particular area and saw two women together - one veiled, one not.
Mr Straw said a meeting with a veiled woman had made him reconsider his views.
Mr Straw wrote of his fears in a regular newspaper column after a meeting with a veiled woman had made him consider the "apparent incongruity" between her English accent and the veil.