varnish

(redirected from varnisher)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

coffin varnish

Alcohol, especially that which has been illegally prepared. Don't give me any more of that coffin varnish, or I'll be drunk in no time!
See also: coffin, varnish

tonsil paint

dated slang Liquor, especially cheap whiskey. The hard-boiled detective sat sipping tonsil paint at the seedy dive bar, waiting for his informant to arrive. Give the man some tonsil paint to deaden the pain till a doctor can be fetched.
See also: paint, tonsil

tonsil varnish

dated slang Liquor, especially cheap whiskey. The hard-boiled detective sat sipping tonsil varnish at the seedy dive bar, waiting for his informant to arrive. Give the man some tonsil varnish to deaden the pain till a doctor can be fetched.
See also: tonsil, varnish

varnished

slang Drunk. Tom's out getting varnished on moonshine with his buddies. She was too varnished to drive home, so I let her sleep on the futon.
See also: varnish

coffin varnish

n. inferior liquor. You want some more of this coffin varnish?
See also: coffin, varnish

tonsil paint

and tonsil varnish
n. liquor; whiskey. The cowboy had to have his daily dose of tonsil paint before he stuffed his face full of beans and hardtack. This tonsil varnish would take the paint off a barn.
See also: paint, tonsil

tonsil varnish

verb
See also: tonsil, varnish

varnished

mod. alcohol intoxicated. (see also shellacked.) Really varnished, he was. Couldn’t see a hole in a ladder.
See also: varnish
References in periodicals archive ?
In each province the authorities established cooperatives for every major artisanal activity, such as weavers (a group further broken down by the materials with which they worked), dyers, basketmakers, and varnishers. The Union of Cooperatives (UNICOP) worked with these local cooperatives to ensure that the artisan corps of every pays worked, according to its capacity and its means, on articles responding exactly to the demands and needs of the customers, thus minimizing competition between the different artisan groupings (CAOM, GGI 65295, Conseil Federal Indochinois, "Rapport No.
Advertisements, for example, can tell us a great deal about a musical culture, as can MC's articles on instrument manufacturers, strikes by piano varnishers, or department stores' musical wares.
In another you see the goldsmith: in a third, painters; in a fourth, varnishers in lacquer work; in a fifth, joiners, turners, tailors and shoemakers; in a sixth, manufacturers of silk brocade, and those fine muslins of which are made turbans, girdles with golden flowers, and drawers worn by females, so delicately fine as frequently to wear out in one night.' Rulers could make or break artisans, some of whom worked exclusively for the royal courts.
In most cases, the varnishers will see themselves as every bit as honorable and conscientious as the investigator who regularly delivers the unvarnished stuff.
(83.) Hamilton cited the 1910 census figures of 277,541 painters, glaziers, and varnishers, and claimed that about 72,500 of these were organized.