vanish

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do a vanishing act

To depart or go away very suddenly or without warning, especially so as to avoid doing or dealing with something. My roommate loves to throw parties here, but she always does a vanishing act the next day when everything needs to be cleaned up! Brian is nearly two weeks late finishing his sales report—that's why he's been doing a vanishing act whenever the boss is around.
See also: act, vanish

pull a vanishing act

To depart or go away very suddenly or without warning, especially so as to avoid doing or dealing with something. My roommate loves to throw parties here, but she always pulls a vanishing act the next day when everything needs to be cleaned up! Brian is nearly two weeks late finishing his sales report—that's why he's been pulling a vanishing act whenever the boss is around.
See also: act, pull, vanish

sink without (a) trace

1. To quickly and thoroughly fail. The new smartphone was meant to revolutionize the industry, but it sank without trace after its commercial release. After his initial breakout success, the director's follow-up film sank without a trace.
2. To be forgotten about by the population as a whole, especially after being very popular. The digital pets fad took the world by storm in the late 1990s, but sank without trace by the end of the millennium.
See also: sink, trace, without

vanish away

To disappear entirely. And just like that, my dreams of ever competing in the Olympics vanished away. The remnants of this ancient civilization have all but vanished away.
See also: away, vanish

vanish from (something)

1. To disappear or pass out of view, sight, etc., especially suddenly or mysteriously. The magician's signature illusion is to make a volunteer vanish from sight.
2. To become missing from some place, as if having been removed or become lost (usually to someone's surprise or confusion). I would give you my stapler, but it seems to have vanished from my desk. That poor little girl vanished from her school back in the '80s and was never found again.
3. To pass from existence on or in some place. The dinosaurs vanished from the earth roughly 65 million years ago. The tribe completely vanished from the land due to the horrible plague.
See also: vanish

vanish into (something or some place)

1. To pass completely out of sight after moving into some place or thing. The ninja stole the ancient scroll and vanished into the shadows. I tried tracking the tiger, but it vanished into the jungle.
2. To become lost in some place or thing. As the dictatorship tightened its grip on the country, more and more political dissidents began vanishing into their nightmarish detention centers. Somehow over $20 million has vanished into this project, without so much as a functioning prototype to show for it.
3. To pass out of existence or memory. Usually followed by "obscurity," After releasing just one hit album, the band suddenly vanished into obscurity in the late '70s. The digital pets fad took the world by storm in the late 1990s, but it vanished into the sands of time just as quickly.
See also: vanish

vanish into the woodwork

To recede or absent oneself from public view; to become or remain hidden in society. The former movie star, never one to vanish into the woodwork, launched a very successful chain of restaurants and eventually ran for public office in Washington state. I think people expected us to vanish into the woodwork after the referendum results, but we made sure to stay firmly in the eye of the public.
See also: vanish, woodwork

vanish into thin air

1. To become invisible or pass out of sight, especially very suddenly or mysteriously. The wizard waved his wand and vanished into thin air. The magician's signature illusion is to make a volunteer vanish into thin air.
2. To become lost without leaving any trace behind. Police have been searching for a young girl who seemingly vanished into thin air two weeks ago. Authorities remain puzzled by the airplane that vanished into thin air somewhere over the Atlantic. The company has yet to explain how $10 million of venture capital vanished into thin air without so much as a prototype to show for it.
3. To be forgotten about very suddenly by the entire population, especially after being very popular. The digital pets fad took the world by storm in the late 1990s, but it pretty much vanished into thin air by the end of the millennium. After releasing their hit album, the band suddenly stopped performing live and seemed to vanish into thin air.
See also: air, thin, vanish

vanish without (a) trace

1. To disappear without any indication to one's or something's whereabouts. Police have been searching for two weeks to find a young girl who vanished without trace from her home in Rochester. Authorities are puzzled by the navy submarine that seemingly vanished without a trace last Thursday.
2. To be forgotten about by the population as a whole, especially after being very popular. The digital pets fad took the world by storm in the late 1990s, but pretty much vanished without a trace by the end of the millennium.
See also: trace, vanish, without

vanish away

to disappear. (The away is considered redundant.) The pizza vanished away in no time at all. The city lights vanished away as dawn broke.
See also: away, vanish

vanish from something

to disappear from something or some place. The money vanished from the desk drawer. My glasses have vanished from sight again.
See also: vanish

vanish into something

to disappear by going into something. All the deer vanished into the forest. Money seems to vanish into a black hole.
See also: vanish

vanish into thin air

Cliché to disappear without leaving a trace. My money gets spent so fast. It seems to vanish into thin air. When I came back, my car was gone. I had locked it, and it couldn't have vanished into thin air!
See also: air, thin, vanish

vanish

see under into thin air.

vanish into (or come or crawl out of) the woodwork

(of an unpleasant person or thing) disappear into (or emerge from) obscurity. informal
The implication here is that the people or things concerned are like cockroaches or other unpleasant creatures living in the crevices of skirting boards and cupboards.
See also: vanish, woodwork

do/perform/stage a disapˈpearing/ˈvanishing act

(informal) go away or be impossible to find when people need or want you: Ian always does a disappearing act when it’s time to wash the dishes.This refers to a magic trick done by a magician in which they make themselves or another person disappear.

disappear/vanish off the face of the ˈearth

disappear completely: Keep looking — they can’t just have vanished off the face of the earth.
See also: disappear, earth, face, of, off, vanish

sink, vanish, etc. without (a) ˈtrace

disappear completely: The boat sank without trace.Many pop stars sink without a trace. After five years no one can even remember their names.
See also: trace, without

vanish away

v.
To disappear gradually but completely: I had to wash the shirt five times before the grass stain vanished away.
See also: away, vanish

vanish into thin air, to

To disappear altogether. Exactly when it was known that the higher one goes the thinner the air (owing to less available oxygen) is not certain. Shakespeare, however, wrote of ghosts that “Melted into air, into thin air” in 1610 (The Tempest, 4:1). A twentieth-century version of this cliché is the vanishing act, said of a person who unexpectedly disappears. It comes from the magician’s trick of making something disappear (hence “act”). The essayist Logan Pearsall Smith used it poignantly in All Trivia (1933): “I cannot forgive my friends for dying; I do not find these vanishing acts of theirs at all amusing.”
See also: thin, vanish
References in periodicals archive ?
Part Three brings us back to the present when David finds the missing piece of the vanisher and puts the two pieces together ...
Heidi Julavits, co-editor of The Believer magazine, is the author of four novels: The Mineral Palace (2000), The Effect of Living Backwards (2003), The Uses of Enchantment (***1/2 Jan/Feb 2007), and The Vanishers (***1/2 July/Aug 2012).
Despite its fantasy overlay, The Vanishers is ultimately a deeply felt exploration of female exceptionalness, both good and bad.
Wyman argues that Oakes Smith's characterization of Iagou in The Salamander (1848) is echoed in Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha (1855) and cites evidence that her work also influenced Whittier's "The Little Vanishers" (Two Pioneers 183).
If you're not, The Vanishers will provide a similar jolt of transgressive, feminine thrill." KAREN R.