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a good value

1. Literally, that which has a high quality, quantity, or worth but is offered at a low or reasonable price; a bargain. $1.50 for a sirloin steak? What a good value!
2. An affable, charismatic, and/or entertaining person. Primarily heard in Australia. John's a good value, he's so much fun to have at parties.
See also: good, value

be taken at face value

To be accepted only based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. The best salespeople are the ones who are taken at face value by their customers.
See also: face, taken, value

face value

The apparent or base value of something, assessed without further examination or consideration. Don't try to pick apart this movie for deeper meaning, just take it at face value. I made a mistake when I took my manipulative aunt's word at face value.
See also: face, value

at face value

1. Based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. You can't judge someone like Nicole at face value—she's actually much friendlier than she seems at first.
2. In exchange for the official price printed on a ticket (as opposed to a resale price determined by the seller). I'll even sell you the tickets at face value. Come on, that's a good deal! If we want to see The Rolling Stones, we need to get tickets at face value before they sell out—they'll be way too expensive once people start reselling them.
See also: face, value

take (someone or something) at face value

To accept that something or someone is as it seems based only on an initial or outward appearance, without further verifying or investigating. Why some people take what that pundit says at face value is beyond me. He clearly has an ulterior motive. You're right to be wary, but, in this case, I think we can take John at face value. He's just trying to help.
See also: face, take, value

value judgment

A judgment about someone or something based upon one's own personal beliefs, opinions, ideologies, etc., rather than objective facts or criteria. Their decision to fire him seems like a value judgment, as the manager has expressed in the past how he disliked Mike on a personal level. I implore you, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, not to make a value judgment when deciding my defendant's fate. You can't convict just because she disgusts you at a personal level—you have to decide whether she broke the law or not.
See also: judgment, value

at face value

from outward appearance; from what something first appears to be. (From the value printed on the "face" of a coin or bank note.) Don't just accept her offer at face value. Think of the implications. Joan tends to take people at face value and so she is always getting hurt.
See also: face, value

take someone or something at face value

to accept someone or something just as it appears; to believe that the way things appear is the way they really are. He means what he says. You have to take him at face value. I take everything he says at face value.
See also: face, take, value

take something at face value

to accept something exactly the way it appears to be. I don't know whether I can take her story at face value, but I will assume that she is not lying. The committee took the report at face value and approved the suggested changes.
See also: face, take, value

value someone or something above someone or something

to hold someone or something to be more important than someone or something. I value her above all things. He values his car above his family!
See also: above, value

value someone or something as something

to hold someone or something in esteem as something; to find someone or something to be as good as something. I value you as a close friend. I value this watch as a keepsake.
See also: value

value someone or something for something

to hold someone or something in esteem for a particular quality. I value him for his skill in negotiation. I value this car for its speed and dependability.
See also: value

value something at something

to consider something to be worth a certain amount. The museum curator valued the vase at one million dollars. I value this vase at one million dollars.
See also: value

at face value, take

Accept from its outward appearance, as in You can't always take a manufacturer's advertisements at face value; they're bound to exaggerate . Literally this idiom has referred to the monetary value printed on a bank note, stock certificate, bond, or other financial instrument since the 1870s. The figurative usage is from the late 1800s.
See also: face, take

at face value

COMMON
1. If you take what someone says at face value, you accept it and believe it without thinking about it very much. Clients should know better than to take the advice of a salesman at face value. He can be a little too trusting at times and has a tendency to accept things at face value.
2. If you take someone at face value, you accept the impression that they give of themselves, even though this may be false. For a time I took him at face value. At that time, I had no reason to suspect him. She tends to accept people at face value. Note: The face value of a coin or banknote is the amount that is printed on it, although it may in fact be worth more or less than that amount, for example because it is very old.
See also: face, value

take somebody/something at face ˈvalue

accept that somebody/something is exactly as they/it first appears: You can’t take everything she says at face value.A diplomat learns not to take everything at face value.

a ˈvalue judgement

(especially British English) (American English usually a ˈvalue judgment) (disapproving) a judgement about something that is based on somebody’s personal opinion and not on facts: ‘She’s quite a good driver for a woman.’ ‘That’s a real value judgement. Women drive just as well as men.’He’s always making value judgements.
See also: judgement, value

take at face value, to

To accept something or someone at its apparent worth. The transfer of face value from monetary currency to other matters took place in the nineteenth century. “He must take advertisements of publishers at their face value and regard them as what they claim to be,” wrote J. L. Whitney (The Literary World, 1883).
See also: face, take
References in periodicals archive ?
The correlation in participation in optional course components and course grade is 0.29 with a probability value of 0.00026.
In addition, the cost of an asset does not necessarily bear any relationship to its value. At the other end of the business spectrum, there is at least one entertainment company that has assigned no value to the multi-release recording contract of an artist whose last release sold more than 25 million units worldwide.
We adults teach and demonstrate the values our children possess.
Values are not a policy straightjacket yet, the paper says, but they do rule out certain choices.
Instrumental values are valued only because they are perceived to be the key to protecting or fulfilling intrinsic values.
In the random laboratory-effects model and its special case the nonexistent laboratory-effects model, the expected values of the sampling distributions of [x.sub.1],..., [x.sub.n], and [x.sub.R] are all equal to Y.
All that is required is the recognition of the need to differentiate itself and dedicate sufficient effort to define its unique value to customers and to strive to deliver that value.
The use of inspirational sayings, stories, and quotations from a diverse group of secular and spiritual leaders will model values of respect, tolerance, peace, and harmony.
Fair values reflect point estimates and by themselves do not result in transparent financial statements.
Of course, buildings are unquestionably social products, embodying the values of the societies that build them, but each one is also shaped by individual consciousness, or a series of individual consciousnesses.
The Tax Court majority's valuation, as the Fifth Circuit noted, was the precise median between the values computed by the two experts; see 461 F3d 614, at n.
This definition abandons a longstanding practice of using the transaction price for an asset or liability as its initial fair value. In other words, fair value will no longer be based on what you pay for something; it will now be based on what you can sell it for, also known as its "exit price."
The income approach values the metalcaster by converting its earnings into value.
It literally illustrated the application and interaction of the four FIST values. (See reader comments in "From Our Readers" on page 52.)
Per SFAS 141, goodwill is determined through a residual method as the difference between the fair values of all other acquired assets and liabilities and the business equity value.