value

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a good value

1. Literally, that which has a high quality, quantity, or worth but is offered at a low or reasonable price; a bargain. $1.50 for a sirloin steak? What a good value!
2. An affable, charismatic, and/or entertaining person. Primarily heard in Australia. John's a good value, he's so much fun to have at parties.
See also: good, value

be taken at face value

To be accepted only based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. The best salespeople are the ones who are taken at face value by their customers.
See also: face, taken, value

face value

The apparent or base value of something, assessed without further examination or consideration. Don't try to pick apart this movie for deeper meaning, just take it at face value. I made a mistake when I took my manipulative aunt's word at face value.
See also: face, value

at face value

1. Based on the way someone or something appears or seems, without being verified or investigated first. It's important that the current period of economic growth is not taken at face value by the government, as there is still a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done. You can't judge someone like Nicole at face value—she's actually much friendlier than she seems at first.
2. In exchange for the official price printed on a ticket (as opposed to a resale price determined by the seller). I'll even sell you the tickets at face value. Come on, that's a good deal! If we want to see The Rolling Stones, we need to get tickets at face value before they sell out—they'll be way too expensive once people start reselling them.
See also: face, value

take (someone or something) at face value

To accept that something or someone is as it seems based only on an initial or outward appearance, without further verifying or investigating. Why some people take what that pundit says at face value is beyond me. He clearly has an ulterior motive. You're right to be wary, but, in this case, I think we can take John at face value. He's just trying to help.
See also: face, take, value

value judgment

A judgment about someone or something based upon one's own personal beliefs, opinions, ideologies, etc., rather than objective facts or criteria. Their decision to fire him seems like a value judgment, as the manager has expressed in the past how he disliked Mike on a personal level. I implore you, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, not to make a value judgment when deciding my defendant's fate. You can't convict just because she disgusts you at a personal level—you have to decide whether she broke the law or not.
See also: judgment, value

at face value

from outward appearance; from what something first appears to be. (From the value printed on the "face" of a coin or bank note.) Don't just accept her offer at face value. Think of the implications. Joan tends to take people at face value and so she is always getting hurt.
See also: face, value

take someone or something at face value

to accept someone or something just as it appears; to believe that the way things appear is the way they really are. He means what he says. You have to take him at face value. I take everything he says at face value.
See also: face, take, value

take something at face value

to accept something exactly the way it appears to be. I don't know whether I can take her story at face value, but I will assume that she is not lying. The committee took the report at face value and approved the suggested changes.
See also: face, take, value

value someone or something above someone or something

to hold someone or something to be more important than someone or something. I value her above all things. He values his car above his family!
See also: above, value

value someone or something as something

to hold someone or something in esteem as something; to find someone or something to be as good as something. I value you as a close friend. I value this watch as a keepsake.
See also: value

value someone or something for something

to hold someone or something in esteem for a particular quality. I value him for his skill in negotiation. I value this car for its speed and dependability.
See also: value

value something at something

to consider something to be worth a certain amount. The museum curator valued the vase at one million dollars. I value this vase at one million dollars.
See also: value

at face value, take

Accept from its outward appearance, as in You can't always take a manufacturer's advertisements at face value; they're bound to exaggerate . Literally this idiom has referred to the monetary value printed on a bank note, stock certificate, bond, or other financial instrument since the 1870s. The figurative usage is from the late 1800s.
See also: face, take

at face value

COMMON
1. If you take what someone says at face value, you accept it and believe it without thinking about it very much. Clients should know better than to take the advice of a salesman at face value. He can be a little too trusting at times and has a tendency to accept things at face value.
2. If you take someone at face value, you accept the impression that they give of themselves, even though this may be false. For a time I took him at face value. At that time, I had no reason to suspect him. She tends to accept people at face value. Note: The face value of a coin or banknote is the amount that is printed on it, although it may in fact be worth more or less than that amount, for example because it is very old.
See also: face, value

take somebody/something at face ˈvalue

accept that somebody/something is exactly as they/it first appears: You can’t take everything she says at face value.A diplomat learns not to take everything at face value.

a ˈvalue judgement

(especially British English) (American English usually a ˈvalue judgment) (disapproving) a judgement about something that is based on somebody’s personal opinion and not on facts: ‘She’s quite a good driver for a woman.’ ‘That’s a real value judgement. Women drive just as well as men.’He’s always making value judgements.
See also: judgement, value

take at face value, to

To accept something or someone at its apparent worth. The transfer of face value from monetary currency to other matters took place in the nineteenth century. “He must take advertisements of publishers at their face value and regard them as what they claim to be,” wrote J. L. Whitney (The Literary World, 1883).
See also: face, take
References in periodicals archive ?
On the importance of a valuation to client, real estate literature seem to suggest that the more urgently a required valuation outcome is needed by a client, the more likely the client will exert influence on the valuer to come up with a particular reported value.
The real estate valuer is presenting an opinion of the results of the current distribution of capital power.
These registered valuers organisations will conduct educational courses in valuation, grant membership and certificate of practice to individuals.
Avoid giving a false result: The professional valuer is obligated to avoid reporting a false amount.
Toumazou chimed in to add that even property owners may make life difficult -- and the data unreliable -- for valuers.
The importance of the experience of the valuer in undertaking such appraisals is paramount as these rely on an increasing number of assumptions which the valuer will need to make based on their view of the market whether it be the proposed use of the land, the costs to construct but also and often more importantly the exit strategies both around pricing but also timing.
The Standards of Valuation Practice sets forth requirements regarding the work, while the Valuers Code of Professional Ethics sets forth requirements regarding the person.
Jon Moore, director at SP+M, said: "The lack of valuers is a real industry issue, so to have attracted professionals of Roger's and Stephen's experience is fantastic news.
However if by the time the development is completed and profits do not exceed the 15% identified by the District Valuer, the claw back provision would no longer apply.
no judge, barrister, academic, valuer or politician has been able to improve upon it.
Rob Jackson, RICS Middle East director, added: "RICS sees the introduction of Valuer Registration as a fundamental step to supporting the government in their drive for a transparent and sustainable property market through the adoption of international standards and best practice.
Thirlwells Estate Agents, of Middlesbrough and Billingham, has taken on two trainee sales negotiators under the apprenticeship scheme, a senior valuer and an office junior.
The CAG's audit report after the stake sale had pointed out that the global adviser had treated three HZL mines as non- core assets while the asset valuer in his valuation had assumed that five mines were non- operational and had exhausted their economic life.
As a qualified valuer, she can now carry out valuations and I know that she has both the practical and academic skills needed to excel in this specialist role.
Jacqueline has over 20 years experience as a specialist jewellery valuer.