value judgment

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value judgment

A judgment about someone or something based upon one's own personal beliefs, opinions, ideologies, etc., rather than objective facts or criteria. Their decision to fire him seems like a value judgment, as the manager has expressed in the past how he disliked Mike on a personal level. I implore you, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, not to make a value judgment when deciding my defendant's fate. You can't convict just because she disgusts you at a personal level—you have to decide whether she broke the law or not.
See also: judgment, value

a ˈvalue judgement

(especially British English) (American English usually a ˈvalue judgment) (disapproving) a judgement about something that is based on somebody’s personal opinion and not on facts: ‘She’s quite a good driver for a woman.’ ‘That’s a real value judgement. Women drive just as well as men.’He’s always making value judgements.
See also: judgement, value
References in periodicals archive ?
They seem to exist either in a world of metaphor (what does 'ruling' actually mean?) or to be linguistic constructs which point towards supra-historical verdicts on the past based on value judgements current in the contemporary West ('crimes', 'victims').
Finally, I found the `judgement' interesting, in that it equates with what we are dealing with today: the same arrogance and value judgements from the prime minister and his ministers.
Putting it bluntly, it was based on a value judgement that the white race was superior to the black race.
Implicit to the market-based critique of the GPI is that the new measure substitutes value judgements for the objectivity of the market, an argument that updates age-old questions about economic theory for the end of the millennium.
As Wackernagel points out, the market itself is a value judgement, as it dismisses everything but financial transactions.
One of their suggestions is to abandon attempts to separate value judgements from ecological science, because gaps in our knowledge are so great that we will repeatedly have to make educated guesses about how to fill in the gaps - and guesses of this kind inevitably involve value judgements.
* Avoid value judgements such as "your work is too slow," or "your station is sloppy." The employee deserves to know specifics: what, when, where, how and ultimately why they are required to perform a particular task.
7 Probably just well, for computers which could learn to make value judgements about unlike variables might really become a threat to the human race as many science fantasts have proposed.