value judgment

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value judgment

A judgment about someone or something based upon one's own personal beliefs, opinions, ideologies, etc., rather than objective facts or criteria. Their decision to fire him seems like a value judgment, as the manager has expressed in the past how he disliked Mike on a personal level. I implore you, ladies and gentlemen of the jury, not to make a value judgment when deciding my defendant's fate. You can't convict just because she disgusts you at a personal level—you have to decide whether she broke the law or not.
See also: judgment, value

a ˈvalue judgement

(especially British English) (American English usually a ˈvalue judgment) (disapproving) a judgement about something that is based on somebody’s personal opinion and not on facts: ‘She’s quite a good driver for a woman.’ ‘That’s a real value judgement. Women drive just as well as men.’He’s always making value judgements.
See also: judgement, value
References in periodicals archive ?
4 FEATURES Kelly Jones talks fatherhood, famous pals and exciting future 'Phonics plans 8 Scouse actress Alison Steadman goes in search of Welshness 12 They're still singing, a year after the Choir of the Valleys fist came together in sweet harmony 13 Singer Katherine Jenkins talks drugs and Value Judgements 10 COLUMNISTS Aled Blake asks if Britain has become more selfish since the Westminster coalition 11 If it hadn't been for boys, perhaps Lynne Barrett-Lee would be singing for her supper these days 14 BOOKS How about a cookery book as a present for the non-chef in your life to get them started 17 CYMRAEG Math gwahanol o yfed a gyrru sy' wedi denu sylw Lefi Gruffudd 18 FOOD & DRINK Turkey or something else for Christmas dinner?
Learn how to assess condition and make important value judgements with this essential collector's guide.
Mr Gazeley avoids value judgements and confines himself to 'the material condition of poor working-class families'.
Individuals need the freedom to act on their own value judgements, even if those judgements are disagreeable to others.
Seriously, Hays' piece raises the issues of how far scholars can legitimately t ake their personal enthusiasms, and to what extent it is permissible to make contemporary value judgements about the design of the past.
The first sections set out how they can do the following: plan the process; collect, collate, and analyze data; make value judgements and act upon them; and organize processes for continual monitoring and review.
Getting us and our institutions, especially the courts and legislatures, to once again exercise integrity by drawing lines based on values instead of taking refuge in endless procedural rituals precisely in order to avoid value judgements will not be easy, and the role of the legal profession in fostering or impeding such a shift is far from certain.
They seem to exist either in a world of metaphor (what does 'ruling' actually mean?) or to be linguistic constructs which point towards supra-historical verdicts on the past based on value judgements current in the contemporary West ('crimes', 'victims').
One of their suggestions is to abandon attempts to separate value judgements from ecological science, because gaps in our knowledge are so great that we will repeatedly have to make educated guesses about how to fill in the gaps - and guesses of this kind inevitably involve value judgements.